Skip to main content

Full text of "Chimes, 1947"

See other formats


I 




I 





OAcI o 



f u t S J a 



M 



uicdn « sd^^ 



+liur sdo 



*1 





) f 




Cf- 



.V 



vO 



.V 

V 



.V 



.V 















N/ 









Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/chimes194700bere 



I 



Hutchins Library 

of 

Berea College 

Berea, Kentucky 



THE CHIMES 
BEREA COLLEGE 
BEREA, KENTUCKY 
1947 



♦ 



V 



"^ 



:i, 



^ ' V. •-J.M 



V^*^ 

V^.^^ 



# 



:t; 



ifir 



^^i^"^R-* 



' \ 



College 378.7691 B487c 1947 

Berea College Collegiate dept. Senior 

class 

Chimes. 



We ask no pledge of love! 

We ask 
the reason why the sparrow hawk 
goes to meet the morning sun 
on eager wirgs and cries aloud 
the pain that hunger breeds. 

We seek 
to know the hope that taught the hawk 
to fly. 

We ask no pledge of love' 
We do not seek to know a day 
of rest from pain, or sleep so sound 
that dreams shall not recall the ache. 



We dream, we march, we seek, we live 
to meet the down on mighty wings. 



THE CLASS OF 1947 









JKk. 


"-■-■., - 

ill 








I 


1 


is 




> ;'; '-'^||- 




1 


. 


M^ 




^ 


A. 




r| 


1^ 




. *^ 


^ 1 


1' i 


V 


wLiT^ ] 






^'■^'^s^^fc 






«r j| 




|..^- 




-fie 


: Jf ' 


^14.3^ 


. - 

I** 


'■4 

\ 




4 



Al McKelfresh, President; Jean Clark, Secretary; Oscar Davidson, Social 
Chairman; June Settle, Project Chairman; Not in picture: James Gilreath, 
Vice President; Frances Vondivier, Treasurer. 




Another campus. Another year. 




Kathryn Alice Abels 
Parkersburg, West Va. 
A.B., Philosophy 

Harold C Abney 
Richmond, Kentucky 
A.B., Mathematics 



Robert Kirkpatrick Adams 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 
A.B., Economics 

Willard E. Arnett 
Rose Hill, Virginia 
A.B., English 



Mary Ellen Ayer 
Pleasant Hill, Tenn. 
A.B., Biology 

Garrett Dixon Bailey 
Burnsville, North Carolina 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



Climb the creaky stairs of Liberal Arts Building or sit in intent 
absorption over The Iliad, Economic Geology or Marriage and the 
Family, or eat a sack supper with a group of friends perched on 



the edge of East Pinnacle, then state in simplest terms what be- 
ing here has meant: Another campus . . . another year .... 
Yet, it has meant much more than the passage of hours into days. 



Harry C. Bailey 
Tip Top, Kentucky 
B.S., Agriculture 

Frances Elliot Barkley 
Trinity, Kentucky 
A.B., Biology 



Williom V. Baxter 
Vanceburg, Kentucky 
A.B., Mathematics 

Mildred Beverly 
Drift, Kentucky 
A.B., Economics 



Delmos H. Boen 
Guntersville, Ala. 
A.B., Biology 

Leonard Charles Brewer 
Mentor, Tennessee 
A.B., Economics 





Jean Ellen Bright 
Marlinton, W. Va. 
A.B, English 

Katie Frances Brown 
Harts, West Virginia 
A.B., English 



Gladys Virginia Buchanan 
Estatoe, North Carolina 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 

Ruth Ann Burnette 

Clio, Kentucky 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



Anna Elizabeth Clair 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., Home Economics 

Elizabeth Jean Clark 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., Home Economics 



It has been buildings and fields, books and bullsessions, wisdom 
and foolishness; most of all it has been the faces, voices and 
minds of our friends. 



We have learned of the power that the combination of buildings, 
books and people can exert, and we now realize that it is through 
an intelligent function of the three that we are able to attain com- 



Carol Ann Coapman 
Punjab, India 
A B., Sociology 

Lacy Ernest Cochran 
Williamsburg, W. Va. 
B.S., Agriculture 



Henry Clay Coldiron 

Twila, Kentucky 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 

Richard H. Comer, Jr. 
South Boston, Virginia 
A.B., Physics 



Cleora Ruth Conley 
Gallipolis, Ohio 
A.B., English 

Lester J. Cooper 
Lickburg, Kentucky 
A.B., Education 





Mary Elizabeth Cordier 
Stanford, Kentucky 
A.B., Economics 

Sadie Katherine Cordier 
Stanford, Kentucky 
A.B., Mathematics 



Mildred Gabbard Cotton 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., English 

Elizabeth Turner Crumbley 
Colquitt, Georgia 
A.B., Sociology 



Florence Lucile Crumpler 
Woyland, Kentucky 
A.B., Economics 

Oscar Davidson 
Brutus, Kentucky 
A.B., Economics 



prehension and conversation, the very bases of our civilization. 
The buildings were our first sight of Berea. Coming on the bus 
from the south we saw the white columns of Presser Hall and 



the massiveness of E.R.; from Richmond and the north the rec- 
tangular brick blocks of Cumberland and Blue Ridge met our 
curious eyes; if we came by train we saw Draper Tower spiking 



Margie Davis 
Parcoal, W. Va. 
B.S., Agriculture 

Gertrude Partain Day 
Knoxville, Tennessee 
A.B., Education 



Marvin Buford Dillon 
Oak Hill, West Virginia 
A.B, Biology 

Frank Duff 

Chavies, Ky. 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



Paul Eugene Elam 
Corbin, Kentucky 
A.B., Biology 

George Lynn Fallis 

Malad, Idaho 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 





Ernest Benson Few 
Taylors, South Carolina 
B.S., Agriculture 

Frances Finnell Vandivier 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., Music 



Porter Henderson Gilbert 
Samaria, Kentucky 
A.B., Economics 

James E. Gilreath 
Corbin, Kentucky 
A.B, Economics 



Hunter Dale Griffin 
Shinnston, West Va. 
A.B., Philosophy 

Roberta Verne Holcomb 

Viper, Kentucky 

B.S., Home Economics 



the sky. We wondered, a little anxiously, what these new shapes 
held for us. We inquired their names and locations timidly from 
those who appeared to know, and felt a warm sense of comrade- 



ship if they didn't. Imperceptibly we became acquainted with 
each of the structures of iron, wood, and brick that were to be our 
homes and our laboratories. Gradually each one came to have a 



Margaret Hansel 
Pine Hill, Kentucky 
A.B., Home Economics 

Albert E. Hartley 
Seattle, Washington 
A.B., Economics 



Eileen Barnawell Hartley 
Maryville, Tennessee 
A.B., English 

John D. Haun 
Crossville, Tenn. 
A.B., Geology 



Lois Culbertson Haun 
Surgoinsville, Tenn. 
A.B., Geology 

Peggy Hicks 
Bryson City, N C. 
B.S., Home Economics 





Harriet Lucia Hoffman 
Meshed, Iran 
A.B., French 

Oliver Raymond Hunt, Jr. 
Gastonia, North Carolina 
A.B., Chemistry 



Reuben A. Hunter 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
A.B., Sociology 

George Samuel Hurst 
Pineville, Kentucky 
A.B., Physics 



Elizabeth Louise imrie 
Long Island, New York 
A.B., Sociology 

Dorothy Elizabeth Ison 
Ashland, Kentucky 
A.B., Sociology 



personality and meaning of its own. 

Draper has been the center of our more serious life. It well fitted 

that role. Its tower could be seen from every part of the campus 



end from the hills, a reminder of the upward aim of our work. At 
times we were inclined to be skeptical about that upward aim 
when confronted by the multitudinous forms of the Lower Division 



Maxine Irene Jennings 
Prenter, West Virginia 
A.B., Psychology 

Leon Felix Joyner, Jr. 
Woodcliff, Georgia 
A.B., Economics 



Mary Louella Keener 
Berea, Kentucky 
A B., Biology 

Eleanor Louise Knotts 
Vienno, West Virginia 
A.B., Music 



Edith Christine LaFon 
Oneonta, Alabama 
A.B., Home Economics 

Edna Lee Lombert 
Durbin, West Vo. 
A.B., English 





Dalton C. Lane 
Kingsport, Tenn. 
A.B., Mathematics 

William Ransom Ledford 
Franklin, North Carolina 
A.B., French 



Ruth Mary Liddle 
Madison, Wisconsin 
A.B., Home Economics 

Reavis Pinkney Lowman 
Connelly Springs, N. C. 
A.B., Geology 



Joe Andrew McClung 
Rainelle, West Va. 
A B., Education 

Nancy McGuire 
Beattyville, Ky. 
A.B., Sociology 



Off ice, but we were acutely conscious of it while learning the 
subtleties of Greek thought or the inspired beauty of Shelley. The 
long tiled halls and the dark brown doors symbolized the dispas- 



sionately analytical and the unhurried sober qualities of the scho- 
lar. Draper was purposeful, as we wanted to be. We went out of its 
doors sometimes confused, but eager and realizing what there was 



Albert Leon McKelfresh 
Sumner, Illinois 
A.B., Economics 

Dorothy Price Medich 
South Bend, Indiana 
A.B., Sociology 



Margery Ruth Murphy 
Yonkers, New York 
A.B., Sociology 

Doris Louise Neal 
Bristol, Tenn. 
A.B., Sociology 




I 

\ 



Mildred J. Nelson 
Corbin, Kentucky 
A.B., Biology 

Chester Arthur Newsome 
Biscuit, Kentucky 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 








Alice Helen Nicholas 
Waynesville, N. C. 
A.B, Psychology 

Juanita Downs Nolond 
Waynesville, N. C. 
A.B., Psychology 



Ralph Emerson Norman 
Miami, Florida 
A.B., Economics 

Annie Sue O'Doniel 
North Belmont, N. C. 
A.B., Education 



Eloise Oliver 
Clifton Forge, Va. 
A.B., English 

Schorlene Oney 
Road Fork, Ky. 
A.B., English 



to be learned. 

The staidness of Lincoln Hall reflected the security and respected 

position that we wished to gain. Lincoln was also the place where 



registration really hurt and where we tried to convince the Dean of 
Labor that our talents were too great to be spent on institutional 
labor. The hollows worn in its wooden steps stated eloquently that 



Dorothy Palmer 
Oak Park, Illinois 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 

Emil Foy Penley 
Gate City, Va. 
A.B., Sociology 



Ethel Irene Pigman 
Woyland, Kentucky 
A B., Hist, and Pol. Sci 

Betty Lou Powers 
London, Kentucky 
A.B., Music 



Lillie Margaret Pressley 
Jefferson, South Carolina 
A.B., English 

Violette Louise Proffitt 
Burnsville, North Carolina 
B.S., Home Economics 





Maggie Frances Puckett 
Old Hickory, Tenrtessee 
A.B., English 

LaRue Rowlings 
Ringos Mills, Ky. 
A.B., Economics 



Woodrow Wilson Reed 
Lexington, Kentucky 
A.B., Psychology 

Robert R. Rickard 
Thoma, West Vo. 
A.B., Chemistry 



Colette Justine Rieben 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., Sociology 

Constance Roberts 

Concord, N. C 

A.B., Home Economics 



we were but a few of the many to climb toward some goal with its 

help. And our spirits were humbled by that thought. 

In the Library we found the true riches of our ancestors: their 



thoughts, ideas, emotions. The close rows of the stacks clasped 
wealth for the mind, enough to maintain us and our children and 
their children. The spaciousness of the Reserve and Reference ' 



Joan Steele Rowe 
McMinnyille, Tenn. 
A.B., English 

Alice Marie Russell 
Hadley, Massachusetts 
A.B., Sociology 



Earl B. Rynerson 
Harrodsburg, Ky. 
B.S., Agriculture 

Lorraine Salyer 

Hiltons, Virginia 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci 




Virginia Moie Sanders 
Pleasureville, Ky. 
A.B., Education 

June Elise Settle 
Parkersburg, W Va. 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 





Garneta Shannon 
Charleston, W. Va. 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 

Betty Shufflebarger 
McDowell, Kentucky 
B.S., Home Economics 



Jane Markarian Shutt 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., Philosophy 

Carrie Pauline Sloane 
Mouthcard, Kentucky 
B.S., Home Economics 



Alma Estelle Smith 
Pine Hill, N. C. 
A B., Psychology 

Gayle Asher Smith 
Pineville, Kentucky 
B.S., Home Economics 



Rooms with their high ceilings inspired study; we went to the Li- 
brary with that inspiration in mind, but we often exchanged 
whispered ideas without feeling guilt. 



Presser Hall, the Art Building and Science Hall each had its ex- 
clusive following, but we all knew them. Often on Sunday after- 
noons we have sat in Gray Auditoriumat Presser and listened unti 



Norreen Alison Smith 
East Claridon, Ohio 
A.B., Psychology 

Esther Louise Spence 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., Music 



Hughes H. Spurlock 
Bar Creek, Kentucky 
B.S., Agriculture 

Arietta June Stanley 

Toler, Kentucky 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci 



Ruth Steinberg 
Newark, New Jersey 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci 

Frank Stuart Stillings 
London, Kentucky 
A B., Mathematics 





Jean Gibbs Stillings 
Detroit, Michigan 
A.B., Mathematics 

Sammye June Sturdivant 
Hindman, Kentucky 
B.S., Economics 



Laura Frances Sturgill 
CJterokee, Kentucky 
A.B., Sociology 

Alexandria Mary Stylas 
Boston, Massachusetts 
A.B., Home Economics 



Margaret L. Susong 
Jonesboro, Tennessee 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 

Sarah Elizabeth Talbot 
BurkesviMe, Kentucky 
A.B., Chemistry 



the coming of twilight to the quiet music of a string quartet or to 
the rolling power of Bach on the organ. We have found beauty in 
shape and color or gazed raptly at an inner urge which has found 



expression in the exhibit rooms and studios of the Art Building. 
Science Hall has furnished the key to the intricacies of frogs, 
rocks, and the qualities of matter; through its telescope we have 



Rachel Taylor 
Pineville, Kentucky 
A.B., Education 

Lyell Jerome Thomas 
Owingsville, Kentucky 
A.B, Economics 



Lewis Edward Waddle 
Somerset, Kentucky 
A.B., Economics 

Frank Hoff Walker 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
A.B., Geology 



Alta Whitt 

York, Ky. 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 

Vera Mabel Wright 
Myra, Kentucky 
A.B., Sociology 





Norma Aline York 

Woynesviile, N.C. 
B.S., Home Economics 

Gretka Young 
Abberille, S.C. 
A.B., English 



Elinor Joan Zipf 
Cleveland, Ohio 
A.B., English 

Gene David Berber 
Paintsville, Ky. 
A.B., Physics 



Mary Frances Brcdshaw 
Drexel, North Carolina 
A.B., Biology 

Karl Warming 
Jellico, Tenn. 
A.B., Economics 



seen the stars. 

At TP's, Elkin's, and the Hangout we have drunk our cups of coffee 

and voiced our half-formed thoughts while relaxing for a pitifully 



few moments. At Pearsons, Cumberland, James, Seabury, we 

have lived, slept, and played. 

And we remember now that buildings will be our last sight of Berea. 



Maris Engle 
Hindman, Ky. 
A.B., Education 

Marifa Maxirte Burton 
Monticello, Ky. 
A.B., Education 



Nina Clark 
Brownsville, Ky. 
A.B., Mathematics 

Hollis B. Copeland 
Birchwood, Torn. 
A.B., Chemistry 



Dorothy Elizabeth Baldwin 
Fletcher, North Carolina 
A.B., Home Economics 

Zcnobia Hope 
Dayton, Ohio 
A.B., English 





From the cradle on . . . 

Berea doctors and nurses are on the job 

to make the journey longer. 



SENIOR NURSES 



Margaret Browning 
Chattaroy, W. Va. 

Lenora Judy 
Springfield, Ohio 



Normo Lykins 
Edna, Kentucky 

Rita M. Matheson 
Grayson, Kentucky 



Virginia K. Norris 
Porkersburg, W. Va. 

Mildred T. Ranker 
West Liberty, Kentucky 



Helen Vastine 
Flat Lick, Kentucky 

Gloria J. Wanland 
Los Angeles, Calif. 




I jlHL it 




/"^ "~^ "— ^ ««««««^ -«»,^ 







Miss Martha V/ylie (supervisor), Fannie Patrick, Jessie Higginbotham, 
'ean Emerson, Jean Haring, Alma Kipp, Ivaleene Caudill, Helen Porker, 
Flo Fugate, Mary Ruth Smith, Mrs. Chose ond baby. 

Betty Sizemore, Loretto Peterson, llene Stanley, Alice Hook, Syble Fever, 
Wilmo McConnell, Helen Winfrey, M ss Ruth Collins (oss't. instructor), 
June Allen, Virginia Gerwig. 




Doctors Hafer, Armstrong, Hutchins, and Paine 








f 



^ 




'And gladly wolde he lerne and gladly 
teche." 




President Francis S. Hutchins, Mrs. Hutchins, Ann, Didi, and Billy. 



Louis Smith 

Dean of Upper Division 

Julio Allen 

Dean of Women, Upper Division 



Charles N. Shutt 

Dean of Lower Division 

Katharine True 

Dean of Women, Lower Division 



Roy N. Walters 

Dean of the Foundation School 

Grace Wright 

Dean of Women, Foundation 
School 




Though buildings can be lost around curves in the road and their 
images eventually recede to infinity in our memories, books are as 
intimately useful and as present as our shoes. We have carried 




Luther M. Ambrose 


Mary E. Anders 


Alice J. Anderson 


Agnes M. Aspnes 


Education 


Music 


Music 


Home Economics 


Virginia L. Auvil 


John S. Bangson 


Esther L. Beck 


Lawrence D. Bibbee 


Asst. Registrar 


Biology 


Business 


Treasurer 



them to meals and to the classrooms and even on hikes to the hills, 
hoping to have a few minutes of communion with them. We have 
read them while listening to the Capehart; at two hours past mid- 
night we have turned their pages; some of us have pondered their 



meanings until the sun brought forth others to read again. Often 
in our books we have recognized ourselves peering back at us 
through the griil-work of words, and those v/ords assumed a per- 




Earl W. eiank 
English 'dramatics! 

Wilbur Greely Burroughs 
Geology 



Mary Louise Caldwell 

Physical Education for Women 

Ernest Q. Campbell 
Psychology 



Julian Huntley Capps 
Chemistry 

Margaret G. Chapin 
French 



Albert Joseph Chidester 
Education 

Lee Forbes Crippen 

History and Political Science 




Albert 0. Dekker 


Helen H. Ding 


man 


Irvine M. Dungan 


Mary L. Ela 


Chemistry 


Sociology 




Psychology 


Art 


Wilson A. Evans 


Paul F. Geren 




Charles C. Graham 


Adelaide Gundlach 


Alumni Secretary 


Economics 




Education 


Registrar 



sonal significance, for they revealed what others had never seen 
in us. We have discovered comfort, joys, and intricate possibil- 
ities. In them we have found wisdom end startling truths that 
have compelled us to think and to reconsider what we had previ- 



ously accepted. Such portions we marked with black, blue and 
red leads, hoping that we would remember the meaning of those 
lines, not merely in order that we might compose some essay but 








Rose Maureen Faulkner 
English 

J. Clayton Fearer 
Philosophy and Religion 



Grace Grether 
Art 

Oscar Henry Gunkler 
Physical Education for Men 



Willard N. Hogan 

History and Political Science 

Billie Bert Huffsmith 
Music 



Jerome William Hughes 
English 

Dayton D. Hulburt 
Director of Admissions 




1// ^f\, ■./■/■ 



Herschel L. Hull 
Biology 

Martha M. Kelsey 
Phys. Ed. for Worn. 



Wm. R. Hutchcrson Gladys V. Jameson 
Mathematics Music 



Marian Kingman 
Home Economics 



Minnie L. Ledford 
Ger. and French 



Orrin L. Keener 
Social Studies 

Charlotte P. Ludlur 
Ancient Languages 



that later they would assist us in acting more intelligently as hu- 
man beings. 
After those final phases of study were ended, we walked away 



from the examination rooms, came home and showered, then or- 



ranged our books in neat rows on shelves, realizing that what we 
had actually learned would now be a part of us and would be 
manifest in our thoughts and in our responses to other people. The 




Minnie Maude Macaulay 
Physical Education for Women 

Ira J. Martin 
Philosophy and Religion 



Virginia P. Matthias 
English 

Robert G. Menefee 
Economics 



Howard Brandon Monier 
Agriculture 

Harriett Julia Noylor 
History 



William Edward Newbolt 
Economics and Business 

Waldemar Noll 
Physics 




George S. Noss 


Bonnie N. Oden 


Ray Orr 


Merton D. Oyler 


Phil, and Relig. 


Music 


Agriculture 


Sociology 


Charles E. Pauck 


Elisabeth S. Peck 


Lester F. Pross 


Donald W. Pugsley 


German 


Social Studies 


Art 


Mathematics 



written words we had left behind for the professors to read were 

only keys that would not fit. 

The organization of the Great Books Discussion Group has 



brought to the campus a consciousness that should be brought to 



every campus of the impact which certain books written ages 
ago have had upon our modern concepts. The universality of hu- 
man thought was made evident at those meetings where students 




Eiizabeth Richardson 
French and Spanish 

Ruth Rietveld 
Ht.me Economics 



George Gilbert Roberts 
Mathematics 

V. D. Roberts 
Physics 



William Gordcr* Ross 
Philosophy and Religion 

John William Sattler 
English 



Morguerite Sloan 
Lower Division Office 

Emily Ann Smith 
English 




Claude 0. Spillman 


Hattie E. Stowe 


Dorothy W. Tredennick Eunice M. True 


Agriculture 


English 


Art Home Economics 


Warner M. Vernon 


Ernest J. Weekes 


Albert G. Weidler Virginia R. Woods 


Agriculture 


English 


Economics Home Economics 



and professors read and discussed, among others, the writings of 



Aristophanes, Machiavelli, Rousseau. 




Norris Woodie, Hildo Lone, 
Co-Social Chairmen; James 
Shaffer, President, Sammye 
Sturdivant, Treasurer, Mar- 
garet Myers, Secretary; Bar- 
baro Goddard, Vice President 



THE JUNIOR 




Floyd Slettvett, Eleanor Hall, Maxine Kennamer, James Kennamer, James Edwards, Jean 
Hudson. 

Joan Lykins, Tom Finney, Sam Scruggs, Clyde Worley, Theda Taylor, Phyllis Jones, 
Modine Smith, Jose Rubio. 



^■^7 




On this campus and on other campuses there has been a revival 
of interest in Thomas Wolfe, not because his books have been 
carried unchecked from the library shelves by admirers, but be- 
cause no one has ever written as he did. No one has ever in- 
terpreted with such lyricism and poignant insight what it means 
to be young, to be young and lonely and full of wanting to do 
something. 



S-;. 



Dean Cadle, Charlotte Johnson, 
Robert Blanton, June Josper, Albert 
Shuff lebcrger. 





Elmer Sanders, Ella Foster, 
Grant Bonks, Wondo Eskew, 
W i n t z Jenkins, Nancy 
Furry, Edith Melton 



During the year we've also read Chaucer, Shakespeare, Edith 
Wharton, Feeds and Feeding, and translated the symbols and dia- 



Dorothy Davis, Ramona Loyne, 
Clay W h i t a k e r , Morgoret 
Southard, Kenneth Perkins, 
Lilburn Goode, Margaret Davis 




Joseph Sumner, Betty Jean 
Morgan, Lois Rowe, Joyce 
Lockhart, Curtis Keener 




grams in Engineering Surveys. WeVe read The Hucksters and 
Hiroshima and have become acquainted v/ith Robinson Jeffers 
and Robert Frost. 



Helen Storsand, William Welsh, 
Florence Baker, Reva McMillan, 
Frances Howes 




Our reading of books has been a search and a means toward that 

search. 

People are the agents that transform buildings and books into a 







Merle Stanley, Dorothy York, Helen Smith, Lottie Pollock, Elizabeth Broadbooks, James Taylor, Jucnita 
Turner, Risse Layne. 




Hilda Karlsson, Clinton Soger, Irene Boker, Ellen Watts, Helena VVolters, Dora Campbell 

Arietta Norton, Ray Davenport, Mary French, Julia Pearl Thomas, Doris Swingle, Mitchie 
Duff 



college; they have done more than vitalize stone and ink: they 
have shaped our own personalities, and we in turn have altered 
theirs. Without them there would be no campus, no books, no 
buildings; without them there would be nothing. 
This year has seen an appreciable increase in the number of those 



Joseph Houston, Alma Tonkersley, James Hall, Joyce Reedy, Betty Pierce, Harold Reynolds, Moe 
Watts 









^^^!:^ 




Juanita Cooper, Marietta Purkey, Robert McNeill, Elsie Coffey, Betty Lou Chandler, Helen 
Barnes, Joan Stephens 

Silvia Sewell, Marian VanWinkle, Catherine Snyder, Eunice VanWinkle, Ernest Raines 
Mary Lou Smith, Walter Stark 



Cordelia Slusher, James 
Mines, Clinton Ramey, Lois 
Speer, Mary Lou Baker, 
Cecilia Stolnaker 




who walk along the paths of the campus and attend classes; for 



Sue Kilbourne, Mack Adams, Nancy Clem, 
Jean Croucher, Elmer Anderson 





Virginia Kearns, Freddie 
Fugate, Juanita Ketchersid, 
F r i s b y Smith, Joanne 
Bridges 



the first time since the war there is a near-equality between men 
and women. We meet many who dropped from our circles to dis- 
appear into the anonymity of serial numbers for one to four years 




Virginia Watts, Jesse Mir- 
acle, Jeanette Austin, Jean 
Justice, Walter Cox, Hugh 
Morrison 




Clinton Clay, Hilda Outlaw, 
Dean Lambert, Glenn Lively, 
Conrad Kimbrough, Robert 
Boehm, Robert Lufburrow 



and longer. They have traveled far and have felt the utter, awful 



Billie Sue Davis, Ola Massey, 
Anna Johnson, Jeanne Hardy, 
Virginia Morris, Harold Adams 




Marvin Mise, Polly Brooks, 
Nancy Brooks, Jenny Belle 
Fitzpatrick, Margaret Frye 




loneliness and futility of men waiting for the unknown to happen. 
Those students have returned. 



"i 



Frances Edwards, Gladys 
Ogle, Doris Dungan, Koth- 
erine Ogle, Elinor Crawford 





•?MSi^i£i^i>k>s 



7 




THE SOPHOMORES 



John Browning, president; Peggy 

Talbot, secretary; Rossie Drummond, 

treasurer; Harold Dowdy, vice-pres- 
ident 





Harvey Rutnoski, John Robbins, Mary Baucom, Bill Baucom, Robert Lang, Patricia Prater, Dewitt 
Creger, Robert Webb, Fred Chapman, Pot Moore 



For each of us the majority of people on the campus have only 
colored the backdrop against which our personal little clique en- 
acted its tragicomedy. Aliens toour group only formed the faces 
that filled the chapel seats or made up the long lists of alpha- 



Hal 



Glenn Harris, Catherine 
French, Roberto Casa- 
bianco, Jessie Downs, 
Dorothy Brannan, James 
Yowell, Margaret Trum- 
bo, Beatrice Lovette, Dale 
D e d m a n , Margaret 
Templin 




betically-arranged names on file in the various offices. 

With a few persons we have become especially intimate and with 



Lucy Stewart, Bill Atwo- 
ter, Louise Corn, Fred 
Cooper, Winston Bowling, 
Lavaun Halsey, Bill Dunn, 
Pauline Deal, Rosa Lee 
Case, Roy Wilson 





Fmogene Miller, Herbert Moore, 
Mary Sue Baker, Charles Line- 
berger, Marbeth Peters, Imogene 
McConkey, Ralph Michael, Lu- 
cille Martin, Ford Mink 



them we have had our dates and our love affairs. Some of us 
viewed love as a spiritual experience producing exaltation; others 
regarded it as something to be pursued with the same continuity 



R u s s e 1 Dean, Benjamin 
Frye, Harry Dodd, Nadene 
Gosser, Clara Eppard, Bad- 
gette Dillard, Julius Hayes, 
Charles Elliott 




that we breathe. To those whom we loved we laid bare our fears 
and hopes, wanting desperately to find understanding; often we 



Dennis Tipton, Charles Keyser, 
Sue Storm, Naomi Eppard, Jerry 
Crouch, John Benson, Doris 
Messer, Helen Bowman 










Burgin Wood, Virginia Jo Crutch- 
field, Helen Hardesty, Christine 
Chadwell, Janet Marsh, James 
Bandy, Kenneth Calmes, Virginia 
Hylton 





Herbert Tuck, Tom Van 
Sant, Lawrence Via, 
N o rv e I I Sharp, Helen 
Webb, Juliet Lewis, Effie 
Taylor, Cloyd Eastham 
Emmy Voden, Peter Ste- 
les, Helen Sweet 



tried hard to say what we meant, but never got beyond a joke or a 
laugh. In those affairs we were sometimes deeply cut, both 




Marjorie Gabbard, Otha 
Howard, Wayne Proffitt, 
Gene Ballenger, Amanda 
Clark, Mary Ruth Mills, 
Gladys Walker, Janice Os- 
burn, Orville Pearson, Bar- 
brea Hill, Kathleen Banks, 
Homer Banks 



Faye Feltner, Norma Holder, 
Esther Richardson, Jean Wat- 
son, Jane Propps, Martha Fry, 
Marjorie Harrison, Enola Belle 
Foley, Georgia Roberts, Betty 
Mayfield 




angered and hurt, through forgetfulness or blunders. From such 
intimacy we have learned the delicacy of the human soul. 
Among the people we met on the campus and in the classrooms 



Joe Patton, Carl Jenkins, Ruth 
Boggs, Linley Stafford, Carol 
A n m u t h , Ben Pendleton, 
Tobie Woolums, James Mc- 
Neer, Elena Cipolla 




Charles Blevins, Charles Zim- 
merman, Bill Rickard, Charles 
Rickard, Jesse Hibbitts, Mary 
Frances Yount, Lillian Miyachi, 
Mabel Pollard, Wanda Mam- 
mons 




Margaret May, Mary Esther 
Tally, Nora Pickett, Dons Wat- 
son, Chessie Wright, Ronda 
Allen, Eleanor Panter, Lillian 
Moore, Argie DeSimone 




were some whom we desired to know better than by name; ye 



through indifference or on assumed politeness they kept us at 
distance. We were pained because we did not know why, but we 
ourselves revealed why when we likewise avoided persons who 
wanted to know us better. 



■^ 



Thomas Bilotta, Helen 
Swanson, Mary Abodeely, 
Herman Patterson, Nila Mae 
Blair, Patricia Rae, Patricia 
Brooks, Sarah Ann Hutcher- 
son 




Jack Wilson, Jo Anne Wat- 
son, Eugene Parr, Eugene 
Troutman, James Hessel- 
gesser, George Allen, Bill 
Porks, James Dickerson, El- 
bert Mil'er, Marjorie Keener, 
Aloma Barnes 




Many of US have felt a sense of futility on the campus. We have 
worked on tangents, not knowing the true way nor that for us there 



Loyal Hogue, Mary Alice 
Neal, Glenna Ray, Russell 
Hennessee, Carolyn Hender- 
son, Betty Isaac, Virginia 
Hewlett, Marjorie Holcombe 




Richard Pettit, Franklin 
Parker, Alton Noblett, Jean 
Bennear, Janice Pigman, 
Horry Kilbourne 




even was one, and still don't. Too much attempted; no solution 
found; time not compensated. We have gone away from lectures 



Mildred Allen, Peggy Tal- 
bot, Harold Dowdy, BilPe 
Allen, Omo Burns, Allen 
Franke, Dorothy Branham, 
Janice Wells, Caleb Hurst 





Rose Adachi, Jo Ann Gouge, 
Ruth Schultz, Mary Frances 
Barnes, Rachel Chaffin, 
Marion Haynes, Lewis Bar- 
bour, Cornelia Loven, Ross 
Andrews, James Warrick 



or closed our books confused and wondering; it has seemed that 
we were being rushed through college without being given time to 







■>?n<fir*: 



\%:' 



Joseph Bush, James Dowdy, 
Dorothea Noss, Mildred 
Brandenburg, Jimmie Ann 
Mallonee, Arnold Buckley, 
Peggy Ann Johnson, John 
Hibbard 



absorb what we should. At those times we were despondent and 
longed to get away, anywhere just to be away. Tinne in which to 
rest and rebuild our shattered foundations was precious. We 












i?. 






1- 


5 












^ 


Sib. 




^ 


r 

_J£: 


-m 







M 


1^' 




m 


^ 1 - 


^^■^IH 


.. . 


, 


1 -1 


I iMf 




i 










1 


1 


1 


1 


, 



Janrose Sherman, James Salter, Ouida Hughes, Rossie Drummond, Dois\ Lisenbee, Prinress tngiar.a, 
Jock Bower, Edna Sims, Robert Height, Vandeta Vanover 



would even have accepted the killing loneliness of a Sunday after 
noon just to be free for a while so things could straighten them- 
selves out. 

""''"^^^^^^ Edith Claytor, John Browning 

Nella Walker, Nancy Lisenbee 

K^-^^j i jBgSrJ^, j Flora Cofield, Elizabeth Shep 

y*^ ,^^^1 TT ; I IgfHw^Sggg ' " ard, Norma Morris, Glady 

^ ^^^^hP^^K^ ^^ — Reece, Jewell Phillips, Kennetl 

■MB —^ ^f ^^^^^5^^^ ^ Bibbee, John Thayer 

■ ^ 

'A 





Peter Smellie, Robert Fowikes 
Russell Cornelius, Sam McNei 
Ray Feltner, Forrest Jarretl 
Arthel Gray, Robert Lewis, Ar 
menda Robbins, Walter Size 
more, Edwina Chiles, Alber 
Richardson 




FRESHMAN 
CLASS 



Bill Manning, vice pres- 
ident; Wilfred Howsman, 
treasurer; Calvin B a i rd , 
president: Mar\ Bowling, 
secretary 



A n9W consciousness or the importance of world events has entered 
the campus mind. Many among us have been to foreign coun- 
tries and have learned different customs and attitudes; they have 




! h^0^^ 



Edward Akers, Walter Gardner, Roy Thompson, Doyle Rogers, Jean Hayes, Phyllis Daniels, Nancy Ey- 
mann, Ali Touba, Walter Salyer, Solly Hollin, Odell MacDonald, Doris Beam 



Ernest Woolum, Pauline Pettit, 
Lucy Pennington, Elsie Shuttle, 
Kate Thomas, Alma Powers, 
Don Mentzer, Joline Vickers, 
Lorene Sherman, Joe Yancey, 
Mary Shigeta, Theklo Rosen- 
berg 




seen the misery and injustice which a few uncontrolled men con 
inflict upon nations and how conditions in those nations event- 



Faye Trail, Charlie Stone, Bessie 
Spurlock, Anno Wickline, Lee 
Wickline, Evelyn Smith, Harold 
Spencer, Agnes Rice, Billy 
Moores, Margaret Taylor, Melton 
Wise, Lillie Peterson 




Marders Lovejoy, Kenneth 
O'Dell, Kristjan Kogerma, 
Sidney Miller, Phyllis Mann, 
Ruth King, Lucille Lewis, 
Rena Ketchersid, Russell 
Hoernlein, Florene I s o n , 
Donald May 




ually affect the world. The dramatic efforts of the United 
Nations to build a basis for world order has excited wide interest; 



5,,- ■^- *■ 



Ruth Kouns, Dolores Mel- 
ton, Betty Jean Mayfield, 
Carrie Lee Hall, Jeanette 
Huff, Nancy Stevenson, Jack 
Hodge, LaVern Huie, El- 
berta Miller, Frank Harris, 
Violet Baker, Eugene How- 
ard, Dan Harmon, Clofis 
Hurst 





Pat Brothers, Alan Biggerstoff, 
Ann Bishop, James Bentley, 
Nell Berry, Norma Codispoti, 
Alice Leonhart, Pat Smith, 
Mary Deadrick, Jean Bonks, 
Shirley Hiser, Shirley Beotty 



we wondered how men could be SO foolish as to argue bitterly over 
apparently trival nnatters when the future of world culture lay in 




Billy Maltbv, Willie Laye, 
Evelyn Ayers, Pat Napier, 
Peter McNeill, James Peace 
Lilas Neal, Lenore Gobler, 
Vera Spickord, Louise Arch- 
er, Vivian Adams, Martha 
Bailey, June Puckett, Betty 
Jo Melton, Martha Shurtleff 




Woodie Vaughn, Ralph Wigginton, 
Miriam Crowe, Windle Arms, 
Thomas Hall, David Gilreath, Willie 
Howsman, Ernie Hogue, Betty Jo 
Pearl, Elbert Robinson, Debelou 
Isaac, Sara Byles, Leila Cain, 
Robert Arrington 



Foster Burgess, Lona Cochran, Keith 
Hubbard, Wayne Cornett, Yolanda 
Ander, Mildred Crunkleton, Bill 
Cesser, Frances Stillings, Gerardo 
Guarch, Calvin Bo'rd, Jeannette 
King, Harold Terry, Glenn Cornette, 
BMiie Chambers, Artie Combs 



Eugene Wesley, Jean Morgan, Bob 
Williams, Georgia Richie, Bill 
Manning, Ethan Freemen, Dan 
Bough, Helen Turner, Ruby Duff, 
Ursula Simons, Robert Wesley, 
Frances Barnette, Harold Riley 



their decisions. One midnight as we sat in our rooms studying we 
heard the words that in theory may have significance on wars to 
come. The radio announcer said, "We now interrupt all NBC 
programs to bring you this special announcement: The eleven Nazi 



Colleen Singleton, Claudia Kaler, 
D o r t c h Warriner, Montague 
Tennyson, Woodrow Phillpott, 
Nora Garret, Scott Warrick, 
Edith Melton, Keary Sutherland, 
Jewel Shelley, Isabelle Tucker, 
Helen Tucker 





Jimmy Pigg, Courtney Phillips, 
June Craft, Otis Gabbard, 
Harry Stambough, Ramona 
Booth, Barbara Hefner, Bill 
Rolland, Jacky Hopper, Yvonne 
Fish, Bob Hart 



war criminals met death tonight . . . /'and the regular program 
continued as the dance band vocalist sang "This isn't sometime, 




Curtis Haverly, Artur Jurs, 
Clifton Marshall, Randall Mc- 
Conkey, Sylvia Null, Marilyn 
Hubbard, Virginia Kyer, Lois 
Kyer, Betty Shaffer, Alan Miller, 
Thomos Hancock 



Betty Pingley, Ben Vv'hitmire, 
Myrtle Tonne, Ronald Noel, Rus- 
sel Potton, Louise Shultz, Evelyn 
Wolfe, Kathleen Fyffe, Doris 
Wa'ker, Amelia Shusher 




'^^^^'^^^i-<^^^^j<k^r^- :^ 



Emmett Graves, Leon Moore, 
Clyde McCall, Ernest Morrow, 
Kenneth Dickerson, Margie 
Forte, Marsha Hammond, 
Walter Hunt, Marders Love- 
joy, Wanda Howard, Althea 
Gollihugh 




his is always." But we knew so well that "always" con be such a 
;hort time and that the death of eleven men is just the death of 
eleven men. 




Bill Burkle, Beverley Hays, Wai- 
ter Shelton, Doris Edmundson, 
Dorothy LeFevers, Barbara Hurst, 
Charles Flowers, Lola Sholar, 
Jack Deyton, Gilda Bower, Betty 
Caldwell, Jean Fain, Jacqueline 
Shaw 



Colleen Wheeler, Donald Lain- 
hart, Frank Sligh, Joyce Pen- 
nington, "Skid" Johnson, Phyllis 
Pennington, Mary "Jim" Trail, 
Charles Warnock, Marie Day, 
Edna Hughes, Eudis Singleton, 
Gladys Chaney, Orlin Singleton, 
"Doc" Stevens 



Richard Taitano, Gilbert Girdler, 
Eleanor Louke, Dorothy Talbot, 
Burnis Banks, Margaret Mc- 
Kinney, Sam Hodges, Margaret 
Bradley, Lorene Hudson, Beverley 
Taylor, Helen Pruitt, June 
Hubble, Joe Craft, Nellena Davis, 
June Turner 




Barbara Cassell, Lodye Croddock, 
Hazel Douse, Minnie Sanders, 
Gilmer Collison, Bob Cornett, Bill 
Farmer, Max Chance, Jeannette 
Carr, Pat Dawson, Josephine 
Beck, Shirley Flynn, Hoger 
Arnett, Bryant Brown, Lena 
Yowell 



When we think of this year in terms of a year and weeks and days, 
it may not mean much. And when we think of it in terms of ac- 




Bert Clark, Betty Costo, Myrie 
McNeeley, Virginia Zicafoose, 
Naomi Norris, Suzanne Teweil, 
Evelyn Hammonds, Oreta Allen, 
Dorothv Jenkins, Charlene Sew- 
ell, Jean Grider 










Denis Ball, Marguerite Baker, 
Bill Edwards, John Basham, 
Helen Brumit, Leonora Noll, Bill 
Webb, Margie Blevins, Potsy 
Hamilton, Joyce Alcorn, Okra 
Abbott, Peggy Hamilton, Don 
Funkhouser, Virginia Burgin, 
Dorothy Dorton 




Yvonne Perkins, Mary Elizabeth 
Ferrell, Martha Burks, Clotilde 
Deschomps, Virginia Lone, 
•^ Dorothy Flowers, Maxine Bonner, 
Glenno Kiser, Richard Parker, 
John Ross 



complishments, it still may not mean much. There were days when 
we knew we would do greater thingsthan we had ever done before, 



Joe Ella Wolfe, Nancye Rose, 
Earl Woods, Jean Dawson, 
Rachel Teague, Gladys Sose- 
bee, Ruth Barnes, Jane Mid- 
kiff, Rubye Teague 



Cleta Brook, Joseph Cornelison, 
Clyde Burchette, John Combs, 
Fletcher Bray, Elaine Charles, 
Wina Lee Little, Jolley Duncan 






SPECIAL STUDENTS — James Bentley, Arthur Reynolds, Joe Smith, 
Burnis Bonks 



and there were days on which we died, and because we did die we 
are what we are today. Days on which we were biased in our 
criticisms, not realizing that most of us continue to live more by 
our emotions than by our minds, not that our minds are weak 



HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS 




John Bradbury, president; Bernice Smith, treasurer; Pat Longford, secretary; Bill Hanger, 
vice president 



but that our hearts are imperious. Days on which we chanced to 
talk with someone for whom we had never found interest, and from 




Nora Edith Adkins 
Leek, Virginia 



Clayton S. Anderson 
Wheelwright, Kentucky 



William E. Arrowood 
Spruce Pine, N. C. 



Shirley Marie Baker 
Berea, Kentucky 



Margaret Louise Blizzard 
Jenkins, Kentucky 



Winifred Allen 
Orlando, Ky. 



Lawrence Harold ArRett 
Louisville, Kentucky 



Mabel Lucille Baker 
Norwood, Ohio 



Inez Black 
Bakersville, N. C. 



John I. Bradbury 
Wheelwright, Ky. 



Numia Brodtey 
Paintsville, Ky. 



James Ralph Burton 
Kodak, Kentucky 



Joyce Casey 
Spartanburg, S. C. 



Donald W. Claypool 
Campton, Kentucky 



Edward Colwell 
Kodak, Kentucky 








James Evans Burchfield 
Jellico, Tennessee 



Buena Jean Carrithers 
Bushnel, Florida 



Vivian Clarkston 
Berea, Kentucky 



Jeane DeLony Cochran 
Miami, Florida 



Gene Hurst Combs 
Hazard, Kentucky 



trivial remarks at this meeting we understood deeply. What is ' 



most important is that those were days on which we were lookinc 
for an answer of some kind. One answer is enough. We are fortu- 




Charles Raymond Cooper 
Houckville, Kentucky 



Ruth Annelle Cunningham 
Harrodsburg, Kentucky 



Marjorie Marie Day 
Mill Pond, Kentucky 



Jock Eric Dobbins 
Spindale, N. C. 



Wanda Jean Doyle 
Millstone, Ky. 



Mabeline Coots 
Cumberland, Ky. 



Mary Maxine Davis 
Appalachia, Va. 



Truman Denham 
Tompkinville, Ky. 



David A. Douglass 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Jean Easterling 
Louisville, Ky. 



Glenn Ray Elkin 
Berea, Kentucky 



William James Evans 
Olive Hill, Kentucky 



Dillard Bruce Feltner 
London, Kentucky 




Mary Elizabeth Eubankt 
Glacier Pork, Montana 



Jenny Lind Fain 
Kingsport, Tenn. 



Bette Finley 
Jellico, Tenn. 



Bettye Jean Finnell 
Berea, Kentucky 



Eva Lee Fothergill 
Berea, Kentucky 




Elizabeth Ann Fortner 
Berea, Kentucky 



Joyce Teleatho Gander 
Cannon, Kentucky 



note if we each have found one answer, and it is great enough and 



correct and so strong that we know we won't lose it. Too many 
fail to find even one answer. 




David Robert- Gentry 
Quail, Kentucky 



Edwin Gibson 
Oceana, W. Va. 



Charles William Hanger 
Wheelwright, Kentucky 



Howard Milton Henline 
Spruce Pine, N. C. 



Gladys Hubbard 
Bright Shade, Ky. 



Bette Jo Gevedon 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Hazel Christine Graff 
Monticello, Kentucky 



Robert Harmon 
Wharton, W. Va. 



Ted Katherine Hesse 
Berea, Kentucky 



Gloria Morgan Hudlow 
White Sulphur Springs, 
W. Va. 



Jerald Huff 
Krypton, Ky. 



Martha Lou Hutcherson 
Berea, Kentucky 



Helena Jacobs 
Halls Gap, Ky. 



Margaret Louise Johns 
Haryeyton, Kentucky 



Ora T. Johnson, Jr. 
Irvine, Kentucky 




Robert William Huff 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Dorothy Hvdc 
Manchester, Ky. 



Inez Joan Jenkins 
Rovencliff, W. Va. 



Grace Johnson 
Jabez, Ky. 



Rose Ann Johnson 
Berea, Kentucky 



A few of the persons we've known hove been inestimably infiu- 



ential; they are our teachers, our roommates, our friends. With 
those people we have lived our campus lives. We have discussed 




Faye Kegley 
Ofive Hill, Ky. 



Elva Langseth 
Long Island, N. Y. 



Myra Loferne Louthan 
Sneedville, Tennessee 



Lois Elaine McMahan 
Louisville, Kentucky 



Edith Rose Morgan 
Wyoming, Ohio 



Patricia Longford 
Albany, Kentucky 



Carlos P. Lopez 
Havana, Cuba 



Mollye Elizabeth Lovelace 
Berea, Kentucky 



Hugo E. Miller 
Drift, Kentucky 



Etta Mae Neal 
Berea, Kentucky 



Andrew H. Nicholaus 
Hyden, Kentucky 



Helen May Patrick 
Bereo, Kentucky 



Mildred D. Pennington 
Fielden, Kentucky 



Martin Potter, Jr. 
Louise, Kentucky 



Christine Purcell 
Plato, Kentucky 




Clyne Nolan 

Pine Mountain, Ky. 



Ethel Nolene Pearson 
Moravian Falls, N. C. 



Orie Perkins 
Jellico, Tenn. 



Patsy Marie Pullins 
Berea, Kentucky 



Forrest Winfrey Rice 
Cane Valley, Kentucky 



and argued with them, and eaten and smoked and gone to the 



street for coffee and ice cream. We've gone together to Saturday 
night movies, to special West End shows, and have cheered the 




Jane Robison 
!• Bakersvilie, N. C. 







Rufus Saylor, Jr. 
Akron, Ohio 



Oliver Singleton 
Emmalena, Kentucky 



Olvia Mary Smith 
Disputanta, Ky. 



Shelby Spicer 
Willow, Ky. 



Ray Rose 
Berea, Ky. 



Bales Silas 
Lexington, Ky. 



Bernice Smith 
Hindman, Kentucky 



Anna Lee Sparkman 
London, Kentucky 



A_^^H. 



Irving H. Thornton 
Maitland, Florida 



Ruth Ann Van Cleve 
Berea, Kentucky 



Verna Van Winkle 
Richmond, Indiana 



Sarah Louise Via 
Denver, Colorado 



Phyllis Weaver 
Corbin, Kentucky 



Clinton W. Williams 
Henderson, Kentucky 




Willie Von Home 
Buchanan, Ky 



Ralph Norman Varhaug, Jr. 
Kankakee, Illinois 



James Thomas Warming 
Jellico, Tennessee 



Clara White 
Gate City, Va. 



Roberta Lee Williams 
Middletown, Ohio 



Varsity at evening games. We've token early morning wolks 




Randall P. Williams 
Berea, Kentucky 



Eddie Kay Wilson 
Columbus, N. C. 



Ruth Wyldine Williams 
Berea, Kentucky 



Helen Mae Workman 
Bluefield, W. Va. 



along the field behind E.R. and have climbed Noah's Ark in the 
afternoons, and after dark we have walked with our hand on some- 
one's arm across the rampus and under the catalpa trees along 
Estill street, scuffling the big brown leaves in autumn; we have 
walked through the snow of winter and we've walked in the spring- 
time with our hearts gone to glory. 



L. 




THE FOUNDATION SCHOOL 



FOUNDATION FACULTY — Grace 
Wikon, Reading; John Harman, Bible 
and English; James Durham, Mathe- 
matics; Mrs. Wcldemar Noll, English; 
Harriet Schroeder, Home Economics; 
Grace Wr'ght, Social Studies; Mary 
Williams, Latin; T. M. Wright, Mathe- 
matics; FIrrene Brooks, English; 
Nan^y Barnett, Mathematics; Mary 
Louise Caldwe'l, Physical Education; 
Dora McCowan, Business; Mrs. Anna 
Barnett, Ungraded Classes; Cleo 
Withrow, Home Economics; Helen 
Nichols, Social Studies; Mrs. James 
Taylor, Secretary, Foundation School 
Office; Lucille Troutman, Science 




ELEVENTH GRADE 




Doris Gilbert, Janis Wells, Mar- 
tha Holroyd, Lois Davidson, 
Geneva Smith, Ann Calmes, 
Salustiano Ortiz, Effie Gilbert, 
Mary Goodrich, Lottie Gilliam, 
Vianna Miller, Norma Jean 
Crase, Margaret Gray, Betty 
Sergent, Nadene Wade 



What those people mean to us is a precious knowledge possessed 
by each of us individually. We have learned to interpret their par- 




Ursula Boehm, Esther Allen, Foye 
Black, Edna Spicer, Hershel Beck, 
Sandy Chalmers, Corban Goble, 
Virgil Cook, John Coyle, Ramona 
Combs, Sue Austin, Betty Chris- 
topher, Harold Dorf, Hugh Card, 
John Biggerstaff, John Atkinson 



Orville Helterbrand, Janie Rag- 
Innd, Betty Redmond, Emogene 
G'Ipin, Kay Cooper, Henry Ham- 
ilton, Betsy Churchill, Ernest 
Day, Dolores Noll, Julia Eymann, 
Dorothy Renchen, James Back, 
Bruce Brooks, Burton Archer, 
George Glisson 




ticulor actions and words, and we know their gestures and the sig- 
nificance of the tones of their voices; we know when the kidding 



Fred Shroder, James Smith, 
Juan to S'zemore, Walter Jacobs, 
SheMa Strunk, Bourbon Sing'eton, 
Virg'nia A'^iller, Jean Martin, 
Edna Mae Ruckel, Robert Knox, 
John Snyder 




ends and what comes after. And we know to what degree they 
have assisted us in realizing that the aim of this past year has 
been to learn how to make better buildings, better books and bet- 






Jerry Elkin, Chester Turner, Nova Kuntz, Bill Paty, Christine Fields, Glenn Ison, Sheila 
Strunk, Walter Jacobs, Ethel Reynolds, Ed Strong, Mahala Smith, Joyce Jones 



TENTH GRADE 



Jack Ambrose, Jason Cornett, Gilbert 
Thomas, Sam Morrow, Billy Oyler, 
Donald Vanderpool, Robert Lee Jones, 
Wayne Hymer, Betty Robbins, Janice 
Steohenson, Sylvia Bates, Charlene 
Abbey, Sallie Botes, Edmond Roberts, 
Geroldine Lyttle 




ter men. However, since impure men have constructed some of 



Roy Walters, Jr., Owen Schumacher, 
Bob Hamilton, Isaac Musick, Enos 
Browning, Kenneth Fultz, John Shupe, 
Libby Card, Mildred Holbrook, Mae 
Durham, Carl Groham, Audrey 
Thomas, Willa Smith, Jean Phillips, 
June Moss, Zimmer Luttrell, Betty Jo 
Hendricks 




> '^^ 



" ^^l;.».S^'^^"^'^'^^''^^ 




Joyce Gregory, Rosemary Cook, Eu- 
gene Wilson, Don Jarrell, Doyle Taylor, 
Cleone Sparks, Rose McNees, John 
Jones 




the world's best buildings and since men picgued with the various 



Tommy Kincaid, Bill Chapman, 
Charles McGraw, Frank Calmes, 
Virgil Blackburn, Lester Acree, Don 
Brooks, Bob Capps, Walter Huff, 
Herbert Bell, Helen Litton, Norma 
Gentry, Polly Bryant, Daisy Daven- 
port 




weaknesses of the earth have composed masterpieces with words, 
our primary responsibility is to make better men. It is at times a 



NINTH GRADE 



Walter Hoskins, Manie Gabbard, 
Edith Potter, Lois McDaniel, John Mc- 
Donald, Everett Raines, Gerald Gravett, 
Paul Wright, Toby Taylor, Betty 
Whitaker, Pat Williams, Louella Phil- 
lips, Ernestine Lamb, Juanita Kil- 
bourne. Jack Vance 




Hirschel Allen, Raul Mieres, Martha 
Ortiz, Ruby Cornett, Mae Baker, 
Evelyn Redmon, Estill Barger, Mary 
Armstrong, Helen Baker, Francis 
Bonney, Billy Bryan, James Baker, 
George Akens, Gordon Acton, John 
Abney 





Dorman Litton, Lillian Shepard, Lenc 
Wells, Imojean Stollings, Sharor 
Pollock, Jo Stafford, Mary Jo Walters, 
Lucille Tutt, Allene Wade, Raipl- 
Wade, Irvin Spurlock 



1 ##j5.^.vy.'''''>i ^ . 



>iiE^%*.^Wik 




Everett Kilbourne, Sturm Carroll, Ednc 
Callahan, Robert Ellenberg, Roy Ed- 
wards, Jack Belcher, Bill Foley, Gladys 
Jennings, Bill Evans, Roy Deck, Wilma 
Fortner, Reva Jo Fowler, Mitzi 
Churchill, Ruby Catchen, Verlie Jones 



discouraging responsibility, but even the man that God Himself 
made was far from infallible. 



Gilreath 



Robbins 
Kilbourne 



Mgr. Reynolds 



H. Adams 



Craft 




Coach V/yott 



Lovell 



I. Adams 



Brown 



Rufnoski 



Hale 





FOUNDATION BASKETBALL TEAM 




Harry Kilbourne, coach; Ray Rose, Salustiano Ortiz, Don Jarrett, Owen Schu- 
macher, Dillard Feltner, Roy Walters, Gunkler, Howard Hayes, Bill Huff, 
Hugo Miller, John Bradbury, Bobby Gentry, Bill Hanger, Forrest Rice 




W. A. A. Board — Evelyn Pen- 
nington, treasurer; Doris Neol, 
president; Margaret Susong, 
secretary; Irene Pigmon, vice 
president 








^4^^f^ 




Co-editors 

Willord Arnett 
Ruth Steinberg 




tt. 




■If 



THE STAFF 



Frank Seto, art editor; Jean Justice, Elena Cipolla, June Sett'e, Corban Goble, Betty Sizemore, Leonore Noll, 
Maxine Jennings, co-business mgr.; Joyce Lockhart, Lillie Margaret Pressley, Norris Woodie, Elinor Zipf, 
Jerry Crouch, Dean Cadle, literary editor; Gretka Young, Woodrow Reed, co-business mgr.; Winnie Allen 
Reed, Bill Welsh, photography; Theda Taylor, Dick Bailey, Betty Jean Morgan, circulation; Jane Bishop, 
Eileen Hartley, Noreen Smith, Joyce Reedy 

NOT IN PICTURE — Mary Ellen Ayer, Ruth Burnett, Rosebelle Fallis, Joan Lvkins. Alta Whitt, Tobie 
Woolums, Mr. Roy Walters, Mr. Ben Welsh 



EAST P I N N 



m 

CO 

H 



Z 
Z 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT 




L. D. SENATE 




U. D. STUDENT COUNCIL 




!??95SSBP™'TSP 




U. D. WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION 



U. D. MEN'S ASSOCIATION 





.•^ii***^**^' 



SIGMA PI SIGMA 




PI ALPHA 



HONORARY SOC I ETI ES 



TAU KAPPA ALPHA 



PI GAMMA MU 





?( 


K 1 




\ ^^H- HK- ^^^B ^ 


^ w* 




^^^m 


^ 


i 






IHiiiii^ 


Jm 


rM B 


iftA^H 





THESPIANS 



BEREA PLAYERS 





SCENE FROM HOME-COMING PRODUCTION "BLITHE SPIRIT" 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 



TAU DELTA TAU 





Hl-Y 



LIFE SERVICE 




YMCA CABINET 



lOrWM, 



rv A ^ n 




YWCA CABINET 




VETS' ASSOCIATION COUNCIL 




'B" CLUB 




FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FRENCH CLUB 




COSMOPOLITANS 




ECONOMICS AND 
BUSINESS CLUB 





COUNTRY DANCERS 




PUBLIC AFFAIRS FORUM 



SOCIOLOGY CLUB 





STUDIO ENSEMBLE 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



jR 



^^' 



ftPfill 




WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 




ORCHESTRA 



BAND 





STRING QUARTET 



FOUNDATION 
GLEE CLUB 




AG CLUE 



-i*??!:2.«TX I I 




HOME-EC CLUB 



iL.. 




ROYAL COLLEGIANS 




THE WALLPAPER 



TWENTY WRITERS 




"Varying expression 

From simple phrases to new vibrant sounds. 
We build patterns of young living . . . ." 



NOW 

These are the times of the year for man's wondering, 

watching his being, his living, his love. 

Now while earthforms return fost to earth, 

now when the leaves on the branches are tinged, 

now when the leaves on the ground smell earthy, now 

when a bare branch climbs up from the rest, 

not hidden by branches and showing its own, 
naked and delicate « 

sharpness delineate, jl 

now when the wetness of rain just come, 
past, 
is still on the grass, and the leaves on the grass and 

the wet groundy smell comes pungent and fiery, 
these are the times of the year for all wondering. | 

I 

vVhat can man wonder about being and loving, asking his being 

why 

truthfully \ 

answers not given, '■ 

not in the seeing, the smelling, the touching can be there ' 

quietly 

staying 

quietly? 

t 
I 

Now when he sees and he smells and he knows j 

he comes in his natural form and his being, j 

feels elation, exuberant happiness, love in the change j 

of life to earth sleeping \ 

sleeping, not going, 

changing and growing, 

preparing another frostier beauty, 

making ready another cold and sharp looking, 

the same yet in difference coldly forlorn, 

he 

forsaken by all but his sense and his knowing 

that this is for him, this happiness his 

in his foundation changing 

seeing and smelling 

wondering 

wondering 

— Lester Pross 



EVENING RHYTHM 



WHO SHOULD HAVE BEEN 



Coming 
From the room across the hall: 

Music 
Sliding up and down the wall 

Snake-like, 
Pulling dreams and lovely scenes 

Slowly: 
Kings and queens and guillotines 

Somewhere 
In a land where strangest things 

Happen, 
Where birdies bloom and flowers sing 

Sweetly. 

Always 
When I am tired and sleepy 

Evenings, 
And the music's soft and weepy. 

Sighing 
In the room across the hall 

Softly, 
Then I hear the flowers call 

Sweetly 
And see the birdies gently wave. 

Nodding 
While kings and queens misbehave 

Gladly. 

But I know it's all a dream 

Surely, 
For things may often seem 

Truly 
What they never are at all 

Really 
When music plays across the hall 

Softly. 

— Willard E. Arnett 



Yesterday I met a Man. 

He was the hope of the world 

Yet he held no hope for it. 

"What straw do you extend to me?" 

I cried. 

"Will man catch himself in mid-air. 

See before it is too late 

That his brother's hand 

Is his own hand?" 

"I doubt it," said he complacently. 
"The opposing forces will probably 
Blow each other to bits 
And leave those who want 
To live in peace 
To live in peace." 

I sat mute with pained astonishment. 

This Man, whose name has been 
On the lips of the hopeful — 

But teacher — But teacher — 
I ached to shrill — 

This Man who for weeks and months 
Had endured a physical torture 
Worse than the uncertainty of battle 
Yet who called his spirit free; 
This Man of renowned faith 
In the world of the hopeful 
Silenced me with his despair. 
Not his despair — 
My despair. 

— Gretka Young 



DEAR MAMA 



You have been waiting for me to grow up. 
I have seen you looking at me from baby- 
hood to adolescence and now that I am al- 
most a woman you think that your time is 
near to see in me, your only daughter, all 
the things you never had a chance to be. 

When you were my age. Mama, you were 
on a boat coming to America. You had run 
from your village to Warsaw, and at Brussels 



you had caught an old American liner on 
its last run. You and a little brother and 
sister, a disheartened father and a sick 
mother. Like thousands of immigrants be- 
fore you and after you, you crowded to the 
rail of your ship and stretched out your hand 
to the Statue of Liberty. There on Ellis 
Island two older brothers met you and took 
you to a small farm in New Jersey. You were 



smelling freedom air for the first time in 
your life, Memo, and you felt it was enough 
to keep you alive forever. 

But I was born into freedom air. You 
told me that, and oil these years I have been 
waiting for the same kind of revelation you 
hod when you put your foot on this country. 
It hasn't come, and today I am writing you 
to ask if there is something you forgot to 
teach me, or if there is actually nothing new 
under the sun for me. 

When I was a child I used to say, "When 
I grow up I will do this," or "When I am big 
this will happen to me." I expected each 
new experience to be a revelation, and when 
it wasn't, I thought the next one would be. 
I am fortunate. I hove had a chance to do 
everything. I have roller skated and I have 
studied Latin. I hove been to a senior prom, 
and I have grubbed potatoes before the sun 
came up. I have had close friends. I hove 
been loved, and I have been well taken care 
of. I like my vegetables and my milk and 
I like to brush my teeth. I don't wont to 
smoke and I don't want to drink and I don't 
want to hang out at roodhouses. You 
brought me up well. Mama, but today I am 
asking you for something more. 

Today I am suspended between coring and 
not caring. You must do something more 
for me. I have come away from home and 
in another peoples' church I have looked for 
what they call the universality of man. They 
have made their religion a very personal 
thing and I have expected to find it shining 
out of each one of them separately. Now 
that it has passed. Mama, I can tell you that 
if I had found it shining out of each one of 
them separately, I would hove made it my 
own, at the risk of never seeing you again. 
It would have been a fine thing, don't you 
think, to have had it shining out of each one 
of them separately, but I am so glad that I 
did not find it, for then, like the leader in 
their church, I would have sent a plague of 
missionaries upon the world, not in the name 
of God, but in the name of Western culture. 

Today, although I am almost senseless, 
there is one thing I do know, and it is that 
I am of my own people. On this Sunday 
morning with my head bowed to receive 
what they call a 'benediction,' Mama, I am 
sick for the words of my own, and I know 
that I con never leave again the reality of 
who I am. 



Mama, they hove here teachers, and I 
hove listened to them carefully. Once I 
thought I heard one of them saying the things 
I needed to hear, and day after day and 
month after month, year after year I have 
gone bock to hear her, hoping that eoch doy 
she would soy more. But each day she has 
said only what she said in the beginning and 
that is no longer new for me. It was never 
new under the sun. I do everything she 
soys, Momo. I hold the brush so, and I mix 
the paints so, and I hold the paper first as 
she holds it, and then as my own spirit dic- 
tates, because she has said that is the way 
it must be. And she tells me that I have 
come into her house with on open mind and 
on open heart and she admires my intel- 
ligence, but I have not learned, she tells me, 
what she has tried to teach me. As if I 
didn't know. If I had learned, Momo, I 
would not be writing you today. 

And they have here, Mama, people who 
would be my friends. I would tell you that 
some of them ore, and I will carry them with 
me wherever I go. One is like me, and she 
helps me to take all this out of me and say it 
to you so that I may receive on answer quick- 
ly. A>nd one is not like me, and she gives me 
the hope that I will come out of this. And 
one is a poet and he eclipses us all. And one 
is a scientist, and only he knows what it is 
all about. 

Isn't it funny, Mama — words are the only 
things I know, and they reveal nothing to 
me. My words or anybody else's words. Nor 
symbols. Nor words and symbols together. 
Somewhere I read, "abstractions to a lonely 
eye, grow intimate as hedge and stone — 
Democracy, to boys who die, wears shorts and 
eats on ice cream cone." I held on to it 
for a few days — until the boys came home, 
like they soy. But Mama, the boys are the 
people who were here before they left and 
the people who ore here now that they have 
returned. They have come back with noth- 
ing new under the sun. 

Certainly, Mama, the mountains are noth- 
ing new under the sun. Nor the trees, nor 
the fields, nor the little rocks. Heavens, 
Mama, they ore the oldest things, and per- 
haps — I think OS I write this — the oldest 
things in the world ore the things 1 am asking 
you to teach me again or to teach me for 
the first time if you hove not. I am sick of 
searching in obscure places, I am tired of 



straining for strange-sounding words, and I 
will not hold the brush so any longer. Pretty 
soon, Mama, I will come home, and though I 
am supposed to be coming back with this 
something big I have been sent away to find, 
I tell you now that it is nothing. Nothing 
as compared with putting your foot on free 
ground for the first time in your life. 

— Ruth Steinberg 

MUSEUMS AND TOMBS 

Tread reverently on this hallowed ground? 
Speak softly in these venerated halls? 
Reach lightly toward this old dead splendor? 

Are they then dead and silenced who left 

for you 
This place, these things? 

Not dead, nor in their graves! 

They live in the echoes of your scuffling feet; 
.Their joy goes on through your gay laughter; 
Their hands touch yours across the years 
In ever-growing immortality. 

— Emmie Voden 



FIRE IN THE NIGHT 

I spread my nostrils and snuff deeply of the 

night air. 
Somewhere there is a fire burning: 
A pack of starving hounds that have run down 

their prey. 
Devoured the flesh, and unsatiated 
Are licking the bones, cracking them between 

long fanged jaws; 
Pungent clouds of steam rise supernaturally 
From their heated bodies, give a bloody tint 

to the moon. 
The workings of invisible principles. 
The mystic interplay of matter 
Which changes form but not content. 
Someone's expression of life. 
The countless, small, intimate articles and 

intangibles 
Dissolving into fine ash and smoke 
While he looks on, 

Clutches too tightly a charred remnant, 
Futilely, without realizing. 

— Jerry Crouch 



THE LOONY 



It was a funny kind of job, I thought. I 
was sitting there waiting for Mr, Voorhees in 
his study. Nursemaid to a lunatic; I sure 
hod sunk pretty low. But it would pay well, 
and that was what counted. I always figure 
I con take care of myself. Just why Mr. 
Voorhees wanted to keep his loony son here 
in the house was something I couldn't quite 
figure, but that was none of my business. 

The leather chair was comfortable, and I 
relaxed and watched the flames dancing 
under the new log in the marble fireplace. 
I guessed it was the same fireplace where the 
loony had killed his mother, and I remembered 
the news stories that came out seven years 
ago — "eighteen year old only son of wealthy 
furniture manufacturer implicated in mur- 
der . . . ." The story was a sensation and 
the papers mode the most of it. "Servants 
rushing to the scene found the body of Mrs. 



Voorhees, her head horribly crushed against 
a marble hearth in the study . . . used a metal 
andiron . . . doctors report son as victim of 
epileptic disorder . . . ." 

He didn't know he'd done it until later. 
He was all right most of the time, and his 
father said he would take all the responsibil- 
ity — kept him under watch all the time now. 
I wondered how it would feel to know you 
were crazy. 

Funny how I wasn't afraid about this job; 
but I always figured I could take care of 
myself. The idea was to watch carefully 
all the time, and don't let him sneak up on 
you. 

When Mr. Voorhees came in I stood up. 

"You're Mr. Harris Nicholson?" he said as 
he held out his hand. His grasp was firm 
and slow and somehow sort of, well, genuine. 
Everything about him was sincere, and kind 



of sad even when he smiled at me as he sat 
down. 

His hair was young looking, thick and 
black, but his face in the firelight looked 
tired and like it had had a tough time of it. 
He looked at me gravely and I felt sorry for 
him; I guess he'd really been kicked around 
pretty bad. 

"It may seem odd that I should talk to 
you this way, but I want you to know how it 
is." His hands, that looked gentle and 
sensitive, helped him express what he was 
trying to say. 

"Do you know what loneliness means?" His 
eyes begged me to understand. I could see 
right away he was trying to put something 
across to me about taking care of his lunatic 
son. I was thinking about the times I hod been 
in the ring with the Kid and how I got so I 
could get him on his heels with my old right 
cross to the chin. That made me feel good 
about this lunatic. But I was listening all 
the time I was thinking about it, so Mr. 
Voorhees would know I was sincere about this 
thing. He kept on talking. 

"You are born lonely, and when you die 
you are alone. And some people are more 
alone than others. There is no escape when 
you are shut up inside yourself." He looked 
at me and hesitated. "What I mean is — some 
peope are set apart, with an extra wall of 
loneliness around them that normal people 
don't have." I nodded, and he looked back 
at the fireplace and went on like he meant 
to try to say it whether I got the drift or not. 

"No language can penetrate that void of 
loneliness — no hand can touch the place where 
your soul hears nothing but its own music." 
He wasn't talking to me anymore; it was like 
he was reading words from inside himself. 
He was sitting there real calm, but you knew 
he meant it, and I guess he knew what he 
was talking about, although I was waiting 
for him to get down to where the lunatic came 
in. 

"You speak words, but only with your 
tongue, and the words you speak are only 
an appeal for bread, for warmth, for existence. 
And that isn't what you wont. You can't tell 
them what you really want. The most artic- 
ulate word you have for that is only a 
whimper — or silence — or if you are by your- 
self, tears — to express your voiceless fear for 
the solitude you don't know how to break." 



He stopped and stored at me. "Do you see 
what I mean? Everybody's like that. Some 
of them may not realize that this is what they 
have unconsciously known from the beginning 
of understanding. But you see what I mean?" 
I nodded but I wasn't really sure what he was 
driving at, except to tell me that maybe his 
son got sort of blue sometimes and I was to 
expect that. 

"You want to touch another person's warm 
body with your own — some way to get away 
from the loneliness, but even here is no re- 
lease. Love — love, even if you could have it, 
is just a futile desire to share what is in your 
own soul with someone else — even only one 
other. Because inside you there is some- 
thing exquisite, delicate as a snowflake 
crystal, and it is beautiful and sod and too 
big and wonderful to express. That's what 
you really are inside. And no one knows 
what you ore — no one knows!" He paused, 
and when he started again his voice was soft. 

"Do you like the feel of sunlight? You 
wont to drink it, get it inside you some way, 
to make what you are clear and luminous as 
day — or you wont to be in a crowd — you 
wont to know a lot of people, or just one. 
Just one living soul. Just one. You try to 
break through the walls of silence. Or failing 
that, forget that there is the loneliness inside. 
And then, right in the midst of the noise or 
light or people, the stork emptiness of your 
own soul strikes through and wipes all pre- 
tense away." His hand gripping the arm of 
the chair relaxed. 

"That's what loneliness is — an eternal 
wash of solitude inside your soul. And the 
beauty and pain inside you. Beauty is a 
sod and lonely thing . . . ." 

He was tired now. The firelight made 
deep shadows in the hollows of his face. I 
guess he was afraid he hadn't mode it clear 
to me after all. But I knew what he meant, 
even if he did soy it in a fancy sort of way. 
I had known all along that this loony was a 
special one, and I was prepared without all 
this. 

The door from the hallway opened. A 
white-haired man came in, gently closing it 
behind him. 

"Mr. Nicholson," he said as I got on my 
feet. "I'm sorry you have had to wait. I 
see you've met my son." 

— Eileen Hartley 



HARMONY 

Let me not exist long, 

But often, 

In the dominant tones 

of the scale of life. 
Because these: 
Desire, 
Seeking, 
Expectation, 

Are what moke life beautiful. 
These tones pull the soul towards 
Satisfaction, 
Peace, 
Quiesence: 
The tonic members of life's scale. 

Yet- 
When there is no ideal to demand expression. 
When there is no zeal to demand action, 
When there is no passion to demand attention. 
May I be satisfied to live 
In the every-day, sub-dominant tones 
Of faith, hope, and love. 

— Marjorie Keener 



THE CRITICS 

I heard you play this evening. 

I 
Network of directors, embryo musicians, 
chairmen of Departments 
of so and so; 
Critics of Preparation, Practicing, Rehearsing, 

Performance, 
And I . . . . 

"Does his approach imply a working know- 
ledge of French and German?" 

Provocative suggestions regarding tone qual- 
ity. 

Demands of penetrating knowledge, "refined 
sense of musical styles . . . ." 

Splendid analysis of perplexing bifurcation. 

Midst the educated nods of critical approval 

I smiled at you. 

And noticed the graceful cooperation 

Of your music 

And your body. 

— Frances Bradshaw 



ANTHEM OF THE LOCUSTS 



He left Child's restaurant, and as he walked 
hurriedly down the cavern-like street in New 
York's summer nighttime he suddenly real- 
ized that for the past two days he hadn't 
noticed the heat; he realized that he had 
noticed hardly anything since Anne had come. 
He had on several occasions even put the 
wrong food on the plates. 

This was the second night that he had 
hurried down the street, past the soft lights 
of Radio City and through the solemn dark- 
ness of Rockefeller Plaza, his heart a tight 
ball of fear from knowing that one night 
soon when he climbed to his room she would 
not be there. Anne would be gone even more 
mysteriously than she had come, leaving un- 
explained this mystery that was so much a 
port of her and that hod swept from him all 
initiative to sit down at his typewriter and link 
written words on the blank sheets. 

He turned left on Third Avenue near the 
Rendezvous, the bar where he had met her 
two nights ago, knowing now that when she 
was gone he would come home by another 
street. He had gone in for a beer before 
going home, and she was sitting in a booth 
with a mug in front of her and was studying 



a mop of the city. He had stood looking at 
her a moment, not debating, for he knew he 
was going over and sit with her. But he 
was observing her slender body and the 
nervousness she displayed as she looked at the 
map. 

Later, when they had entered his room, 
she threw herself down across the legless day 
bed that sat flat on the floor and he went 
behind the curtain partition and made coffee. 
And when he brought the cups in and set 
them on the table beside his typewriter, she 
had removed the cheap brown dress and 
lay on the bed naked. 

It was stif lingly hot in the room, and through 
the front section of the building that was 
stored with antique furniture came the noise 
of a passing El train. Then it was eleven 
o'clock in the room and quiet and hot. 

He brought his cotton bath robe over to 
the bed; she stood up, and as he slipped the 
robe about her shoulders she locked her arms 
around his neck, pushed herself against him, 
and kissed him hard. She dropped her arms 
to his waist and held him tightly and laid her 
head on his chest. He swept the robe from 
her shoulders and placed his hands on her 



thin back. She was trembling and the skin 
of her back was moist and cool. 

"I knew I'd find you," she whispered 
against his sport shirt. "Not actually you. 
But you know — you know, don't you?" 

He lifted her face and, holding it close 
against his, saw the play of a slight twitch 
across her lips. She took her lower lip in 
her mouth, and with her chin resting in his 
hand she stood leaning against him with her 
eyes closed. 

He picked up the robe for her. She sat 
down on the bed and stared at him ail the 
time they were drinking the coffee, and when 
he began questioning her she said she had 
come from Chicago. 

"Is your home there?" 

"No. I was going to school. I was a 
divinity student." 

She had been with him two nights now and 
that was all she had said about herself. 



He climbed the narrow stairway past the 
rooms filled with antique furniture to the 
third floor and paused a second with his hand 
on the light switch, afraid that in the lighted 
room he would find himself alone. He 
snapped the switch. Her Bible lay beside 
his typewriter, and Anne lay naked on the 
bed under the open window. She turned her 
head and stared at him but didn't speak. She 
hod her lower lip in her mouth. 

Long after he thought she was asleep she 
turned and, close against him, began whisper- 
ing. 

"Carl?" 

He placed his hand on her shoulder. 

"Do you ever sell any of your stories?" 

"I haven't yet." 

"How long have you been writing?" 

"So long I don't remember. Much over 
five years, though." 

"Why do you continue writing, then?" 

"Mainly because I keep hoping that I may 
write something important." 

"Yes. That's what keeps us all going on, 
isn't it? Hope that the next mail will bring 
the letter we've been waiting for all our lives. 
But people like you and me are miserable, 
Carl. We're never able to say the things 
we want to say, but because we feel them so 
strongly we never stop trying. A few people, 
though, are able to say things just right, and 
to me they are the golden children of the 
earth." 



He lay unmoving, listening to the languoge 
of this strange girl with the pale, nervous 
body, who never smiled and who said so little. 
She was lying on the far side of the bed and 
was talking distinctly into the dork, hot night 
of the room. 

"But what is most important, Carl, is thot 
we try to understand each other. In all the 
towns and in ail the cities we are saying in 
loud voices that we have understanding, but 
our words are no more than the noise of a 
million locusts. We aren't able to under- 
stand each other if we will not accept expla- 
nations and try to realize that we do all the 
things we do because we hope to bring our- 
selves a little more happiness." 

"I know, Anne. But it doesn't work that 
way." 

"That's because there are too many people 
who profess to goodness and reoily have no 
goodness in them. I've found too many such 
people everywhere I've been. My father was 
a pastor in a small town in Illinois, and he 
was one of them. Divinity school was full of 
them." 

"Why did you leave school?" 

"Because I couldn't stand it any longer. 
There was nothing but long hours of lectures 
on the values of doing right — Carl, are you 
listening? There was nothing but talk, and 
talk alone is no good, Carl. You know that. 
Everybody talks too much. Maybe that's 
what's wrong with your stories — maybe you 
talk too much. Most writers do. Even the 
writers of the Bible talked too much." 

She turned in bed and moved her cool 
body close against his and slipped her arms 
around him. 

"Will you write a story about me some- 
time?" she whispered. 
"What kind of a story?" 

"One about people hunting ail their lives 
for someone to love them, and never finding 
anyone. That's the way it is for some people, 
and all they ever find is just a lot of people." 
"I'd like to try it sometime." 
"It seems that it would be so easy." 
"No, it would be hard to write." 
She ceased talking then and, as on the 
two previous nights, the nervousness of her 
body mounted and grew into prolonged f>as- 
sion there in the darkness of morning. 

The lights were on the next night when 



Carl came into the room, and the moment he 
walked over to the bed he knew she was gone. 
He had never suspected that her leaving would 
be like this, though, and he knew now that 
she would always, through all the years, be 
too much with him, like immature bits of 
talent whose companion is misery, to be al- 
ways a port of him, torturously alive but in- 
articulate. ' 

He sat down on the bed beside the thin 
figure and gently traced his fore finger across 
the small lips. They were cold and there 
was no longer the softness of the other nights. 
He brushed a strand of dark hair off her 
cheek, and with the colorless face held be- 
tween his hands he sat with his eyes closed, 
remembering her apprehensive silence by day 
and her language of the dark hours, wonder- 
ing about the mystery of her coming and 
going and the mystery she had left here with 
him. 

He stood up and looked dazedly about the 
room, remembering that she had hod no purse 
and that he didn't even know her last name. 
Her dress was hanging on the wall, and on 
the table under the bright glare of the desk 
lamp was his typewriter with a sheet of paper 
rolled into it, and beside the machine were 
her Bible and the map of the city. 

He sat down at the table; with his elbows 
in front of the typewriter he held his head 
in his hands, and it was not until he glanced 
at the words that he remembered with amaze- 
ment that he had not left the sheet in the 
machine when he quit typing four afternoons 
ago and that the words of the paragraph were 
not his own. 

He read the paragraph at least a dozen 
times, searching in the words for the meaning 
of Anne's life, and then he placed his fingers 
on the keys and began typing. He worked 
the remainder of the night and all the next 
day, oblivious of the heat and of the noise 
of the passing El trains. Only once he left 
the table, and that was to lower the window 
when during the heavy afternoon shower the 
rain came in and sprinkled her body. 

Near dusk he knew the story was finished. 
He had been perspiring in his armpits during 
all the hours, and he discovered that he was 
trembling from the overpowering effect of a 
new excitement: that out of all the years he 
had been writing he was confident that this 
time he had been swimming with his head 
above water. 



He gathered up the pages and began read- 
ing, again reading several times the first 
paragraph: 

"Girls like Anne are the breed of the lo- 
custs. You'll find such girls drifting aimless- 
ly within the confines of monotony that are 
the small towns; you'll find them walking 
precariously the defective webs of the great 
cities of the land. And you may meet them 
OS strangers on hot summer nights, as I met 
Anne six days after her release from the 
Christian Detention Institute for Women." 

— Dean Cadle 



THE VALLEY 

Flesh love is like the sun 

And spirit love like snow; 

When sun becomes too warm. 

Snow tempers it, 

But sun, alone, con scorch 

And leave a desert. 

While snow becomes a glacier. 

Cuts and chisels 

The soil that holds it. 

Blessed the valley touch by both: 
There Alpine gardens bloom. 

— Nellie Crabb 

THE JEWELED ANSWER 

Most ceremoniously 

The minister 

Entered on the noiseless velvet carpet 

The presence of His Majesty. 

He presented the scroll 

On a pellucid cushion 

Of deep-hued royal satin 

To his Sovereign Lord 

And withdrew 

Discreetly 

To await the jeweled answer. 

"I have done well" 

He thought, adjusting 

A fold in his cardinal robe. 

"The reward will come." 

He stepped forward 

Receiving the glittering sceptre 

Inscribed with the sacred message. 

As he turned to depart, 

Sweeping the marble terrace 

With his gleaming tasseled hem, 

The bone of his ankle barked. 

— Gretka Young 



PURSUIT 



THIS IS WHY 



The strength to love was gone; 
Hate stalked his heart. 

The wind was right and since noon 
he had walked the ragged hills; 
the cruel report of twigs that snapped 
beneath his feet had stopped him cold. 
He stooped, removed his shoes and went 
barefooted up the mountainside 
and lay on jagged rocks to sleep 
until the blood was dry. 

He woke 
to spurt a curse and scream revenge 
and walked an hour, in front of hate 
a mile or two, and stopped to sleep 
again and dreamed he fled the hills 
down dusty August paths and fell 
with serpents coiled about his feet. 

Pursued and caught and still pursued, 
he laughed and dreamed release would come, 
and laughed till dreams were frightened out 
and left the frenzied shape alone. 

Beyond the slopes and terrible rocks, 
in fields of tassel ing corn, 
strange and brutal death was found 
and charged to undetermined cause. 

— Willard E. Arnett 



Because 

My gold is the farmer's gold 

Is grain in moonlight 

Because I like sawdust 

And Stardust and both 

When I am still one person 

And my music is 

Rain on tin and 

Wind 

And Beethoven and the 

Song of the hill-born and 

Black; 

And for the 
Smell of train smoke and gasoline 
And gardenias 
For Whitman's joy 
For beauty's truth 
And for the 
Bleeding earth and 
White sand of a land I know 
Where the roots are deep to 
Half way down — 
I write. 

— Rubye Teague 



Compliments 



of 



BLACK BROTHERS 



EMMART PACKING CO. 

PORK AND BEEF PRODUCTS 
"Deliciously Different" 

1200-1220 Story Ave. 
Louisville, 6, Ky. 



Compliments of 

American Cotton Products Company 

2516 South Domen Ave. 
Chicago 8 



BEREA HARDWARE AND GROCERY CO. 
Hardware, Household Appliances 

Groceries Meats Fruits Vegetables 

Phone 470 We Deliver 



c 
o 
m 
P 



e 
n 
t 

s 

e 
f 



YOUNG'S 
STORE 



BUS LINES 



Richmond, Ky. 



Phone 210 



WHERE THE NATION SHOPS AND SAVES 
Over 1600 Store 

J. C PENNEY COMPANY 



Richmond, Kentucky 



COMPLIMENTS OF PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS COMPANY 

238 East Main Street 
Lexington, Kentucky 



Paint, Glass and Wallpaper 

Phones 3840 and 2840 



compliments of 
the elsie shop 



compliments of 



GRAVES COX & CO. 



Lexington, Kentucky 



CODELL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
Winchester, Kentucky 

HIGHWAYS OUT OF MOUNTAINS 



LOWE BROTHERS 



PAINTS & VARNISHES 



Quality Unsurpassed Since 1870 



Compliments of 

J. W. PURKEY & SON 

"Where Bereans Save" 
BEREA, KENTUCKY 




SPUD 
EFFICIENCY aid SERVICE 

whh UNDERWOOD 

STANDARD, NOISELESS ••A 

rORTABLE MODELS 

Accoutdittf MaclUnml.. . 

A MODEL FOR EVEXY UQUttl- 
MENT 

10 KEYS - TOUCH OPERATION 

SitpfdUA... 

RIRBONS AND CARBON PAPERS 

UNDERWOOD CORPORATION 

ONI PAIK AVENUE, NEW TOIK It, N. T. 



compliments of 

JENNING'S DEPT. STORE 
West End of Town 



STATE BANK AND 

TRUST CO. 

Member of Federal Reserve System 
Member of Deposit Insurance Corp. 

Richmond, Kentucky 



Food Products of Quality 

Pickles, Preserves, Jams, Jellies 

and Fruit Butters 

LUTZ & SCHRAMM INC. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 



compliments of 

TEXACO QUICK SERVICE 

44 Estill St. 



Compliments 

of 

ZARING'S MILL 

Use Zaring's Patent Flour 

Richmond Kentucky 



FIRESTONE'S 

Quality Merchandise 

Baker and Baker's Supply Store 

Berea, Kentucky 



Best wishes for the 

1947 

Class of Berea College 

DIXIE WAX PAPER COMPANY 

Memphis, Tennessee 



drop 

in 

for 

coffee 

at 



PAT McCRAY'S 



luLu. 




eLO IICDauC SCHOOLHOliSC 






One of the oldest log schoolhouses still in use, is in the scene of the 
"Renfro Valley Gatherin'/' heard every Sunday morning at 8:15 over 
WHAS, Louisville, Kentucky, and the CBS Southern Network. This 
program, sponsored by Ballard and Ballard, aims at the expansion 
and perpetuation of a community meeting of many years standing in 
the Renfro Valley Settlement — The Renfro Valley Gatherin'. 



COMPLIMENTS 

BRESLER 
SHOE 
CO., 
LTD. 

188-190 

Pryor 

St., 

s.w. 

Atlanta 3 
Ga. 



I 



FINE PAPER SPECIALTIES 
BETTY BRITE 

white doilies, tinted doilies, place mats, 
shelf papers, baking cups 

AMERICAN 

drinking cups, porcell cups, napkins, ramekins, 

tray covers, candy box findinds 

AMERICAN LACE PAPER CO. 

Milwaukee 12, Wis. 



Compliments of 



Central Service Station 



Jl^oons. ^auvin ^ij^ ^lioti 



Products of Student Industries 



Located on the Corner of Main Street 



Opposite Union Church 



Under Berea College Management — Berea, Kentucky 



The H. W. BAKER LINEN CO. 

Est. 1892 

315-317 Church Street, New York 13, N. Y. 

and ten other cities 

Distributors of quality linens to schools and colleges. 



CONCRETE BLOCK 

LEXINGTON CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO. 
Old Frankfort Pike 
Lexington, Kentucky 



compliment's of 



modern beauty salon 



Short Street 



Phone 360 



FERNCLIFF FEED & GRAIN CO. 

Incorporated 
Louisville, Ky. 

Manufacturers of 
"Cracker Jack" and "P.D.Q." 

Molasses Feeds 



THE LANG COMPANY 

329 S. Limestone 21 1 W. Market 

Lexington Louisville 

authorized distributor 

for 

MIMEOGRAPH 

brand 

Duplicators — Supplies — Service 

Made only by A. B. Dick Co. 

Chicago 

mimeograph impression papers a specialty 




VETERANS AT COLLEGE 








?Ji^^ 



z 

ui 
ZD 
O 

I 

DQ 

< 

U_ 

LU 
CL 

Q 



LAUNDRY LINES < 




Compliments of 
Krim-Ko Chocolate 
Flavored Drink 
KRIM-KO CORPORATION 

Chicago, Illinois 



Whether - - - 

It's Badminton or Tennis 

JUNEMAN'S 

Is the Gut Of Champions 



Compliments of 



ENGLE DEPARTMENT STORE 



LADIES' AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



BEREA, KENTUCKY 



Compliments of 
BEREA DRY CLEANERS 

E. L EDWARDS, Prop. 

Cleaning — Pressing — Tailoring 

Special Attention to Student 

Work 

Short St. Phone 328 



CALUMET 

TEA & COFFEE 

COMPANY 

Chicago 



compliments 
of 

locquer 

specialties 

inc. 

newark 
new jersey 



"Meet you at T. P's" 



Compliments of 
WILLIAMS INSURANCE AGENCY 

"All Kinds of Insurance" 

Phone 286 Powell B'dg. Bereo, Ky. 



Be Better Fitted 
in 

BAYNH AAA'S 

Shoes of distinction 
Lexington, Ky. — Louisville, Ky. — Nashville, Tenn 



SLEEPY-HEAD HOUSE 

Main at Broadway 

FOR THE FINEST HOME FURNISHINGS 

'The South's Most Complete Factory-To-You Furniture Store" 

Retail Division of Southern Bedding Co., Incorporated 

LEXINGTON, KY. 

"We Work that You May Sleep" 



John F. Dean ' Edward L. Roberts 

JOHN F. DEAN AGENCY 

Insurance 

Berea Bank & Trust Co. BIdg. 

Phone 35 Berea, Kentucky 



THE SMITH-WATKINS COMPANY 
Incorporated 

:/■ ; 236 E. Main St. .,.:.'■.■■ 
Lexington, Ky. 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE and SPORTING GOODS 

Phones: 28 and 702 




BRYAN-HUNT CO. 



LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 



We Specialize in Foods of Highest Test 



Paramour^ Foods L. & S. Preserves 

Lexirtgt-on Enriched Cream Flour 

Big-Top Peanut Products 




COMPLETE BANKING FACILITIES 

Friendliness — Service — Safety 

BEREA BANK AND TRUST COMPANY 

Berea, Kentucky 




PORTER MOORE DRUG CO. 



GRAINGER'S ANTIQUE SHOP 

Old Glass China 

Objects of Art 

Furniture 
Open Evenings 



Compliments of 
HUNTER-QUEST & CO. 

833 W. Main Street 

Louisville, Kentucky 



THE PADAWER CORPORATION 

Filling Materials 

Cotton Waste and Kapok 

24 Stone Street New York 4, N. Y. 



COMPLIMENTS OF PAN CONFECTIONS 

31 1-329 West Superior Street 
Chicago, 10, Illinois 



SOUTHERN 

TENT & AWNING CO. 

Phone 688 

Office and Factory: 159-165 E. Short Street 
LEXINGTON, 9, KENTUCKY 



THE E. T. SLIDER COMPAN' 

Rivsr Road at Campbell JAckson 231 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

Producers and Shippers of Washed and Screen* 
SAND and GRAVEL from the OHIO RIVER 
Our Motto: "Quality and Prompt Seryics" 




BOONE TAVERN 

OF 
BEREA COLLEGE 

Berea College offers much of interest both in its 
scenic beauties and in its education program. This 
charming inn is located at the gateway to Ken- 
tucky's romantic mountains. Now is your vacation 

time — relax and enjoy the privileges of a college 
community. 



From 




. . . . the Broomcraft, Candy Kitchen, Fireside Industries, Mountain 
Weavers, Needlecraft, and Woodcraft — Student Industries of Berea 
College — Come Handicrafts of Distinction — Admired by All and 
Cherished by Those Who Receive as Gifts. 



BEREA COLLEGE STUDENT INDUSTRIES 
BEREA, KENTUCKY 



A. F. SCRUGGS AGENCY 



all lines of insurance 




Table-^ Grade 

NU-MAID 

the mild, sweet 
VEGETABLE 
MARGARINE 



THE MIAMI MARGERINE CO. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Best Wishes for the Class of 1947 
DAVIDSON BROTHERS AND CO. 

Berea, Kentucky 



compliments of 

COLONIAL HOTEL 
& 
COFFEE SHOP 

We specialize in Fried Chicken 

T-Bone Steaks Country Horn 

We cater to parties and clubs by reservations. 

Coll 84 Berea, Ky. 



THE CHURCHILL WEAVERS 
BEREA, KENTUCKY 




CRAFT MARK 
CHURCHILL 



A Gift for Today — 

An Heirloom for Tomorrow 



compliments of Allen's Flowers 



CENTRAL KENTUCKY'S 
COMPLETE MUSIC STORE 

Pionos Phonograph-Radios 

Organs Band Instruments 

Decorative Accessories 

Records Sheet Music 




EVERYTHING 
IN MUSIC 



147 E. Main 



Lexington 



congratulations 

to the 
class of 1947 

IT IS ALWAYS A PLEASURE 

TO SERVE YOUR SPLENDID 

INSTITUTION THROUGH THE 

BEREA COLLEGE HOSPITAL 

L. T. FLAKE & SON 

hospital equipment and supplies 
153 W. Short St., Lexington, Ky. 



PHILLIP'S SHOE CO., INC. 

"Retailers of Fine Shoes" 

For Men, Women, Cr Children 

107 E. Main Lexingtoa, Ky. 



compliments of 
PARSONS' ELECTRIC 

Hot Point Appliances 
phone 474 



KINGSKRAFT COVERS 

Used On The 1947 CHIMES 
Manufactured by the 

KINGSPORT PRESS, INC. 

Kingsport, Tennessee 



Compliments of 
BEREA MOTOR CO. 

Berea, Kentucky 



JOHN SCHWARZ 

fine footwear 

754 & 756 McMillian St. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 




DOUGHNUT CORPORATION 

OF AMERICA 

393 Seventh Avenue New York 1, N. Y. 



Compliments of 
TOTS & TEENS 

E. Main Lexington, Ky. 



Compliments of 
BEREA NATIONAL BANK 



HURST PRINTING COMPANY 



Office Furniture & Supplies 
Lexington, Kentucky 




BAKERY AND CANDY KITCHEN 
BEREA, KENTUCKY 




■ v»i, 



*'SCu,Ts''^ftTEN 




THE CHIMES 

of 1947 has been produced by skilled craftsmen of the 

Berea College Press 

with the help of many student employees. 
Ever since 1930 the CHIMES has been produced annually by this same 

Printing House 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

THE MITCHELL, BAKER, SMITH CO. 

Lexington's Fashion Store 

230 W. Main St. Phone 6900 




finer quality 
for 94 years 



for more mealtime enjoyment 

it pays to serve 

MONARCH FINER FOODS 

— always look for the 
Monarch Lion Head 

REID MURDOCH— Chicago 

a division of Consolidated Grocers Corp. 



compliments from 
WENNEKER'S INC. 

Sample Shoe Store 
Nationally Advertised Shoes at Reduced Prices 

153 E. Mom St. Next to Strand Theatre 

Lexington, Kentucky 



Compliments of 



Owen McKee 



Richmond, Ky. 



REMEMBER THE 
'HANGOUT" 



1 1\ 




CONGRATULATIONS! 



CLASS '47 
THE COLLEGE STORE 



CLARK, STEWART & WOOD 

I age Chain Link Fence 
Contractors 

Building Supplies 

Lexington, Ky. 



Compliments of 



BOONE TAVERN 



BARBER SHOP 





c 




BROCK-McVEY COMPANY 
Incorporated 




m 

p 


GULF 


Distributors of 


1 


REFINING 


Plumbing, Heating, and Tinners' Supplies 


m 




Vine and Southeastern Streets 


e 
n 


COMPANY 


Lexington, Ky. 


t 
s 





Dine where they serve tempting pre- 
serves and jellies from Sexton's Sun- 
shine Kitchens. They are famous in 48 
states for their pure fruit goodness. 




^ua^^ ^X?^ 



compliments of 

MEEKS 

MOTOR 

FREIGHT 

home office: 

1311 west market st 
louisville 3 kentucky 



BEREA THEATRE 



Where you can always see 



a good show 



HERE'S TO YOUR HEALTH' 



Sanitary Septic Tanks 



Glazed Well Casing 



The Twin Foes of Disease 
Ask your local dealer for clay goods made by: 

LEE CLAY PRODUCTS, INC. 



CLEARFIELD 



ROWAN COUNTY 



KENTUCKY 



ALLEN ELECTRIC COMPANY 

J. T. QUIGG, Owner 

— Incandescent & Fluorescent Lighting 
Engineers — Contractors 



110-112 East Short Street 



Lexington, Ky. 



Phone 1210 



Theatre Equipment and Supplies 

MID-WEST THEA.TRE SUPPLY CO., INC. 

1632 Central Parkway 
Cincinnati 1 0, Ohio 



PUNY'S PLACE 




from a booster for clean sports 



Compliments of 
ELKIN'S DRUG STORE 

Elizabeth Arden 

Time is precious . . but so is 
your loveliness end charm. 
Elizabeth Arden essentials wil 
aid in keeping your face a 
radiant inspiration . . . 

in the minimum of time. 



L 1^1 



Compliments of 

THE NEW FISHERIES CO. 

324-330 W. 6th St. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

PA 5585-9 




LITTLE 
MAMA'S 



Compliments of 



E. E. GABBARD 



Compliments of 
Finnell and Hymer Furniture Store 

Phone 292 Masonic BIdg. 



MARINO BROS. 

WHOLESALE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

IRVINE STREET 

RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 



MOUNTAIN SWEETS 
Hand Decorated Sugars 




Compliments of 

K-CAB 

24 Hour Service 

Telephone 
202 and 353 



Compliments of 

UNITED DEPARTMENT STORE 

Richmond, Kentucky 



HAND WEAVING 




3rtsll ^titcii 
IT'S LOVELY — IT LASTS 

LOOMS AND ACCESSORIES 

in stock now 

Samples and Calalogne — 35c 

HUGHES FAWCETT, Inc. 

115 Franklin St. New York 13 

N.Y. 



Compliments of 



THE SOMERSET REFINERY 



Somerset, Ky. 




CiflSptehl 



$^050 



^eda% HOPE CHEST 

WHEELER'S FURNITURE 



221-23 E. Main 



Lexington, Ky. 




Phot-ographically yours 



SHEARARD 



Compliments of 

ADES-LEXINGTON DRY GOODS CO. 

Lexington, Ky. 

David Ades 
Louis R. Ades 



NU-WAY CLEANERS 

Quality cleaning and prompt service is our specialty 

PHONE 61 BEREA, KENTUCKY 



Compliments of 

ARTVUE POST POST CARD CO. 
225 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK, N. Y, 



Compliments 

of 

RIVERS' SHOE SHOP 

Short St. Phone 312 



IN THE BEREA COLLEGE POWER PLANT 

is an Elliott 1000-kw extraction type turbine-generator unit served by an 
Elliott surface condenser and auxiliaries, which has been operating faithfully 
for the past ten years, furnishing power and heating steam. 

ELLIOTT COMPANY 

Jeannette, Pa. 
Manufacturers of Power Plant, Electrical and Process Equipment 



LOUISVILLE BEDDING COMPANY 

Louisville 2, Kentucky 
Manufacturers of finer bedding for over 50 years 

OLD KENTUCKY QUILTS 

SPRlNG-AlR MATTRESSES 

COMFORTS— QUILTED PADDING— PILLOWS 




BLUE GRASS HOTEL 
COFFEE SHOP 



"SISTRUNK" 

THE BIG HOUSE 

W. T. SISTRUNK & CO. 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 

(Largest in Central Kentucky) 

Fruits — Vegetables — Groceries — Notions — Confections 

Hotel — Restaurant — Fountain Supplies 

LEXINGTON, 26, KENTUCKY 




INC. 



A Means of 
Buying Through 
A Single Source 



THEATRE PRODUCTION SERVICE 

All Supplies and Equipment for the Theatre 

Write for Catalogue 

1430 Broadway New York City 



Compliments of 
ROMINGER FUNERAL HOME 

Ambulance Service 
Tel. 125 & 48 Berea, Kentucky 



Compliments of 

LERMAN BROS. 

'KNOWN FOR BETTER VALUES' 
Richmond, Kentucky 



Our Merchandise 

Is Sold At 
The College Store 

SIMON ADES SONS CO. 

Louisville, Kentucky 



FLOWERS and PLANTS 

BOUQUETS and CORSAGES 

are always fresh and beautiful when ordered from 

RICHMOND GREENHOUSES 
Johnny P. Reichsparr 

Phone 838 Richmond, Kentucky 

WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
CRANE CO. 




^fTcoaaEsar/ 




UAHN % OLLIER AGAIN" 



Tne slogan tnat's backed ty genuine gooaness in 
quality ana service, tne result or 43 years successful 
experience in tne yearbooK tiela. 

We find real satisfaction in pleasing you, tne year- 
nook pumisner, as -well as your pnoto^rapner and 
your printer. 



JAHN g OLLIER ENGRAVING CO. 

Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black or Color 

Commercial Artists - Photographers 
817 W.WASHINGTON BLVD., CHICAGO 7. ill 




Lw. 



this space was contributed by friends of berea college and the chimes 




In honor of Mr. George G. Dick, who retires this year after 
serving Berea College for forty-four years as Power Plant engineer, 
his employees and friends have contributed this space to the CHIMES. 



i 



i 



1 



, 



W 1 

A* 



^ 



.V 



.V 



OA<)o 



■f U • S J « 



H 



uicdn « sd^s^ 



-f kur sdo 



M 




i>u_ 




\ t 




.V 



sO 



.V 

V 



.V 



.V 



















^\^ 
m 



-^K i 






K\...-> 















^1 






, C; 

i o 

i Z 

i T 

I C : 

= 3 I 
S >